City council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 05:48:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png City council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ 32 32 The City of Geneva adopts a new ordinance on parking in the city center | WDHN https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-city-of-geneva-adopts-a-new-ordinance-on-parking-in-the-city-center-wdhn/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 03:44:24 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-city-of-geneva-adopts-a-new-ordinance-on-parking-in-the-city-center-wdhn/ The City of Geneva should take steps to clear a site in the city center to accommodate charging stations for electric vehicles. City officials believe the move will create more parking spaces for a city park, which is expected to be completed later next year. In the near future, Geneva Police Chief Pepper Mock said […]]]>

The City of Geneva should take steps to clear a site in the city center to accommodate charging stations for electric vehicles.

City officials believe the move will create more parking spaces for a city park, which is expected to be completed later next year.

In the near future, Geneva Police Chief Pepper Mock said vehicles parked downtown along South Commerce between the intersection of East Town Avenue and East Westville Avenue would not be permitted. to park “at night”.

This is the location of the future municipal park, and the city wants to “liberate” this space for
charging stations being installed.

Geneva Police Chief Pepper Mock said, “People with electric vehicles, although not very common here, but across the country they are. With much of the beach traffic passing through our area, they will be looking for places to charge their vehicles.

Mike Gurspan says “for a long time resident of Slocomb who says he does a lot of his business here in the city of Geneva. He thinks it’s a good idea to limit overnight parking in one area of ​​Geneva.

Some believe it is a safety issue as well as the removal of vehicles from this section of downtown at night. This could lead to reduced loitering by people late at night.

Ed Mitchell, a resident of Slocomb, says “find someone who will help them. In other words, don’t leave your vehicle here overnight. That’s right, I don’t think they should. I wouldn’t leave mine in a place where I didn’t know where I was.

The board is expected to approve the ordinance at its meeting next Monday evening. Chief Mock says there will be a “grace period” to let everyone know they will receive a citation if their vehicle is left in a designated area overnight.

The simulated head says “all long term and overnight use. This is how the ordinance reads any long term overnight parking so nothing becomes permanent. A citation is $50 plus court costs.

Reporting from Geneva, Mike Gurspan WDHN News for wiregrass.

]]>
The City of Lake Geneva approves the purchase of the former Hillmoor Golf Club land https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-city-of-lake-geneva-approves-the-purchase-of-the-former-hillmoor-golf-club-land/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-city-of-lake-geneva-approves-the-purchase-of-the-former-hillmoor-golf-club-land/ Many Lake Geneva residents cheered and hugged each other after city council members agreed to purchase 200 acres of property near and dear to them. Members of the Lake Geneva City Council on Monday (Sept. 26) unanimously approved the purchase of the former Hillmoor Golf Club property, 333 E. Main St., from Chicago-based White River […]]]>

Many Lake Geneva residents cheered and hugged each other after city council members agreed to purchase 200 acres of property near and dear to them.

Members of the Lake Geneva City Council on Monday (Sept. 26) unanimously approved the purchase of the former Hillmoor Golf Club property, 333 E. Main St., from Chicago-based White River Holdings, LLC, for $6 million and the settlement of the lawsuit with the company. .

City officials plan to sell bonds to buy the property.

Many residents spoke during an hour-long public comment portion of the meeting asking aldermen to approve the purchase. Some audience members indicated they were in favor of the purchase, but asked council to suspend the vote to allow more time to present information to residents.

Several of the aldermen were also emotional regarding the pending vote to approve the purchase.

People also read…

The former Hillmoor Golf Course property has been the subject of discussions between city officials and residents for several years.

Alderman Mary Jo Fesenmaier had tears in her eyes as she read the motion to purchase the property and settle the dispute. Fesenmaier later holds up a book titled “The Park Our City Built”.

Council members also unanimously approved a resolution stating that the purchase of the property would be for public purposes. The resolution says the property will be used for “public and recreational” purposes.

“The seller wants to make sure that we dedicate it to public use and that we are not going to return it and sell it to someone else,” City Attorney Dan Draper said of the incident. the resolution.

Alderman Ken Howell said there were pros and cons to buying the property. He said $6 million is a lot of money and it would hurt the taxpayers of Lake Geneva.

The owner of a $200,000 home would pay a tax increase of $52.98 in the first year.

Howell said if the city loses the lawsuit against White River Holdings, the city would likely have to pay $15 million plus attorneys’ fees, and if the city wins the lawsuit, the whole process could start over.

“Do we want to bet on a lawsuit that might have a bad outcome or do we want to control our future?” Howell said. “I’m going to the side of controlling our future.”

Alderman John Halverson also said he was in favor of buying the property.

“It really is a visionary decision,” Halverson said. “Our future ancestors will thank us for it. I think we should buy it.”

Alderman Shari Straube said she would prefer the property to be used for recreational purposes rather than development.

“It’s also something very special for me. Not only do I have memories of playing golf there, but I’m a person who loves trees, nature and animals,” Straube said. . “Thinking about this land developed or overdeveloped broke my heart. Last weekend we went for a walk with the dogs, we were going to Williams Bay. Now I don’t have to. I think it’s the right thing to do.”

Alderman Richard Hedlund said he favors buying the property, but believes the city should have held a referendum to give residents a chance to vote on the issue.

“I received several phone calls. Most of them were in favor of buying Hillmoor, some weren’t,” Hedlund said. “Some wanted to know more. It may not make sense to do so, but I really feel that when you charge every taxpayer, every owner of the City of Lake Geneva, I think everyone should have a say. I think we should buy it, but I think they should have a say too.

Mayor Charlene Klein said if the sale goes through, she plans to form a committee of residents, environmentalists and conservationists to come up with a plan for the property.

“We’ll find out along the way,” Klein said. “I think it’s something the community will definitely support, and we’ll make a plan moving forward.”

Klein also said representatives from the Geneva Lake Conservancy have offered to help the city clean up the property.

“As far as maintenance goes, I’ve already told the public works department not to worry about anything,” Klein said. “The reserve is going to help organize work days, and I know a guy who has goats, and he said he could come in with 40 goats and clear five acres at a time.”

City officials have discussed the former Hillmoor property behind closed doors on several occasions over the past few months. Klein said city officials couldn’t discuss the issues publicly because of the dispute with White River Holdings.

“Due to litigation, we couldn’t talk about the use of the plan,” Klein said. “We couldn’t talk about funding. We couldn’t talk about anything.”

Representatives from White River Holdings bought the former Hillmoor golf course property in 2016 for around $3.4 million and presented plans to redevelop the site for a mix of residential and commercial development.

City aldermen rejected a proposed land rezoning for the planned development in November 2017 by a 4-3 vote.

White River Holdings officials then filed a lawsuit against the city in 2018, which was later dropped as part of an effort to reinvigorate development talks with the city.

The city council, again, voted against changing its master plan to allow for new uses of the property.

The company then filed another claim against the city in 2020, alleging damages resulting from halted efforts to redevelop the property.

City Council members voted to deny the request in a closed session on October 12, 2020, allowing White River Holdings to sue the city and ask a judge or jury to order the city to pay damages.

The old Hillmoor golf course closed around 12 years ago and the property has remained vacant ever since.

Klein thanked board members for voting to approve the purchase and settle the dispute with White River Holdings.

“You made history tonight,” Klein told the aldermen. “You did a good thing.”

Collection: Return to Hillmoor Golf Course

]]>
Winchester City Council quizzed over ‘huge’ budget as cost of new King George V Playing Field pavilion soars to £3.3m https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/winchester-city-council-quizzed-over-huge-budget-as-cost-of-new-king-george-v-playing-field-pavilion-soars-to-3-3m/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/winchester-city-council-quizzed-over-huge-budget-as-cost-of-new-king-george-v-playing-field-pavilion-soars-to-3-3m/ CIVIC chiefs have been asked about their plans to spend a ‘huge’ budget on the new King George V Playgrounds pavilion. The the Chronicle recently announced that the cost of the installation was to increase to £3.3m, which is £1m more than the original cost in March 2021. The pavilion will replace two decaying buildings […]]]>

CIVIC chiefs have been asked about their plans to spend a ‘huge’ budget on the new King George V Playgrounds pavilion.

The the Chronicle recently announced that the cost of the installation was to increase to £3.3m, which is £1m more than the original cost in March 2021.

The pavilion will replace two decaying buildings on Highcliffe Recreation Ground and approval was given last November.

One of the existing pavilions has already been decommissioned by the city council.

SEE ALSO: Windows County in Winchester goes into liquidation

However, soaring inflation costs in the construction industry have seen all companies tending to the project raise their prices dramatically.

Despite this, the board wants to move the program forward and has requested that additional capital expenditures be allocated.

Speaking at a Cabinet meeting on Thursday September 22, Councilor Caroline Horrill voiced her concerns.

She said: “What a fantastic project to rebuild the lodge and improve our health and wellness facilities, especially right next to Winchester Sports and Leisure Park. It’s a project that I support from wholeheartedly strategically. However, it’s a huge budget. Do we have to run up to £3.3m, and have we considered other alternatives?”

Graeme Todd, a corporate property expert for the City Council, said the current plans for the pavilion met the criteria for use by major contributors such as the Football Foundation and the Cricket Board.

READ MORE: Popular fabric shop set to close within two years

He added: “We have considered redesigning the pavilion to make it smaller, but the cost of redesigning and submitting a new planning application would add up. The construction costs will only increase the more we delay.”

Hampshire’s biggest women’s football club, Winchester City Flyers, has been cited as one of the main reasons the council are so keen to move the project forward.

The authority said it was vital that all of its members – around 500 – had a safe space to change and enjoy the sport following the Lionesses’ Euro 2022 triumph.

Councilor Kelsie Learney said: “A significant number of businesses have been bidding which has increased their costs. I understand the increase we’ve seen is consistent with what other businesses are seeing in their capital projects. ”

She added: “All the while, our existing facilities are getting worse. As mentioned before, women are easily pushed back into sport, and the facilities we have now are sufficient to do this on their own. It’s important that we do this. now instead of waiting for a rabbit to come out of a hat.”

The additional expense was recommended to the full board for approval.

On Thursday 22nd September, the Town Forum agreed to an additional £200,000 as part of the raise bringing its contribution to £450,000.

It was understood that construction could start in January and be completed by October/November 2023.

Cllr Paula Ferguson said that although the facility is in Winchester, around 70 per cent of users come from across the district, including clubs in Littleton, Kings Worthy, Sutton Scotney and Bishop’s Waltham.

]]> Q&A for City Council Candidates: Part 1 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/qa-for-city-council-candidates-part-1/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/qa-for-city-council-candidates-part-1/ SUPPORT THIS INDEPENDENT JOURNALISMThe article you are about to read comes from our journalists doing their important job – investigating, researching and writing their stories. We want to provide informative and inspiring stories that connect you to the people, issues and opportunities within our community. Journalism requires a lot of resources. Today, our economic model […]]]>

SUPPORT THIS INDEPENDENT JOURNALISM
The article you are about to read comes from our journalists doing their important job – investigating, researching and writing their stories. We want to provide informative and inspiring stories that connect you to the people, issues and opportunities within our community. Journalism requires a lot of resources. Today, our economic model has been interrupted by the pandemic; the vast majority of our advertisers’ activities have been impacted. That is why The Capistrano Dispatch now looks to you for financial support. Learn more about our new Insider program here. Thanks.

By Collin Breaux

Paul Lopez, Cody Martin and John Campbell are the three candidates vying for the District 3 seat on the San Juan Capistrano City Council.

Ahead of the November election, we asked them questions on a variety of topics of interest and are publishing their responses. More questions and answers will be published in future issues.

Introduce yourself to voters. What is your general background and what experience do you bring to the table? What is your platform and what issues are important to you?

Paul Lopez

Paul Lopez: Hello, my name is Paul Lopez and I am running for San Juan Capistrano City Council District 3. I am a long-time area resident, landlord, city commissioner, non-profit lawyer, family man and local volunteer with deep roots in our community. As vice president of the San Juan Capistrano Cultural Heritage Commission, I help oversee projects in the city and advise the city council on promoting awareness and preserving our city’s vibrant history. My amazing wife is a kindergarten teacher in San Juan Capistrano, and our two wonderful children attend the same local school.

The first in my family to graduate from college, I worked full time while pursuing law school to support my family. I now work as an in-house attorney for a non-profit organization that provides mental health services to underserved communities in Orange County. I also teach law part-time at two community colleges. My passion for serving the community has also led me to volunteer with a local food bank and coach my son’s Little League team.

Raised by a father who was a veteran and in law enforcement, I learned the value of hard work, discipline, and the importance of public safety and neighborhood protection. I’m running for San Juan Capistrano City Council to continue this record of service and bring my experience and work ethic to the city I love. My goal is to help create an even better city for future generations, with more recreation and small businesses for everyone to enjoy.

Through my background as a lawyer, I understand public safety and what it takes to protect our community. I will work with county and state officials to ensure our law enforcement and fire departments have the resources they need to keep us safe. I will also work to improve traffic throughout our city. Responsible development is closely linked to traffic. I will ensure that any new development maintains the small town feel of our town. As commissioner, I voted against projects that would make traffic worse without bringing added value to the inhabitants. I will directly address our homelessness crisis and find long-term solutions. I will also seek to create new environmental solutions to preserve our beautiful city for generations to come. I will work with all parties for the benefit of San Juan Capistrano.

Cody Martin

Cody Martin: Hi, my name is Cody Martin and I’m running for San Juan Capistrano City Council! I am a lifelong resident of San Juan Capistrano, where I proudly attended Del Obispo Elementary School, Marco Forster Middle School, and was a member of the Boys and Girls Club.

Simply put, I love this city. The decisions I make as an advisor will have a direct effect on me and my family. Growing up in this city has given me a unique perspective on the needs of my neighborhood and the city as a whole. I am a small business owner and I understand the challenges our working families face. I have been involved in politics for over six years now, working for multiple candidates and working as paid staff in multiple states. Additionally, I currently serve as Chairman of our city’s Parks, Equestrian Sports and Community Services Commission, where I have worked to oversee the beautification of our parks and fought tirelessly to protect our open spaces and our equestrian lifestyle.

If elected, I plan to focus on: collaborating and maintaining civility on the stage, reducing traffic and congestion, and maintaining a balanced budget at all times. I look forward to continuing to serve San Juan Capistrano in a new role and always putting people first.

John Campbell

John Campbell: My name is John Campbell. My wife, Hoa, and I have lived in San Juan Capistrano for 16 years. We have been blessed by our historic and scenic town and have participated in many events and activities.

As a representative of your council, I will:

-Fully fund our first responders and deputy sheriffs to promote a safer city. Implement a plan to promote greater enforcement of e-bike safety on our streets and, in particular, our trails. I will encourage the requirement for formal safety instructions and explore special municipal licensing requirements for operating an e-bike within our city limits.

-Find immediate and long-term solutions to remove the homeless from our streets. We talk about some of the most struggling people in our community. Helping the homeless situation is a crucial issue that must be coordinated at the regional level, in close collaboration with our neighboring towns and Orange County.

– Fight against poorly managed sobriety operations in our neighborhoods. These facilities are a dangerous nuisance, and greater enforcement is key here. I will demand a policy requiring inspections to ensure patient safety and compliance with prescriptions, while supporting quality facilities as they do a great job helping those recovering from addiction.

I have a track record dedicated to our city. I am treasurer and board member of the Camino Real Playhouse. We have enjoyed supporting and hosting events for many of our city’s nonprofits, including The Boys and Girls Club, Homefront America, CREER, and Mission Basilica School. My wife is a practicing dentist and for many years she and I have volunteered on medical missions both at home and abroad.

I’m a semi-retired businessman, mostly in construction. I have also worked successfully as a consultant in the medical industry, helping physicians negotiate financial transactions for capital expenditures.

Over the years, I have been a committed citizen and an active participant in municipal administration. I have spoken to Council many times on issues that I consider important to our community. During this time, I have been an observer of both the best and the worst of municipal politics. I commend today’s board for the significant growth that has come to San Juan under their leadership and their ability to remove the unnecessary drama that has engulfed previous boards.

Collin Breaux

Collin Breaux covers San Juan Capistrano and other southern Orange County news as editor of The Capistrano Dispatch. Before moving to California, he covered Hurricane Michael, politics and education in Panama City, Florida. He can be reached by email at cbreaux@picketfencemedia.com.

BECOME AN INSIDER TODAY
Trustworthy, accurate and reliable local news is more important than ever. Support our newsroom by making a contribution and becoming a subscriber today.

]]>
GILBY CITY COUNCIL MEETING Gilby Communi – Grand Forks Herald https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/gilby-city-council-meeting-gilby-communi-grand-forks-herald/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 06:50:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/gilby-city-council-meeting-gilby-communi-grand-forks-herald/ GILBY CITY COUNCIL MEETING Gilby Community Center September 6, 2022 The meeting was opened by Mayor McLean. The minutes of the last meeting were read. Kayla waved and Emily seconded to approve the minutes as read. Accepted/no disagreement. The financial statement was reviewed. Jo Lynn moved and Emily seconded to approve the statement as presented. […]]]>

GILBY CITY COUNCIL MEETING Gilby Community Center September 6, 2022 The meeting was opened by Mayor McLean. The minutes of the last meeting were read. Kayla waved and Emily seconded to approve the minutes as read. Accepted/no disagreement. The financial statement was reviewed. Jo Lynn moved and Emily seconded to approve the statement as presented. Accepted/no disagreement. Current bills were presented, Emily waved and Kayla pressed to pay the bills. Accepted/no disagreement. Current invoices: Ottertail – 737.15/8177, Country Wide – 4.90/8174, Svoboda Sanitation – 3631.36/8181, Pribula Engineering 30,217.00/8179, Knife River Materials – 263,823.00/8175, Schmitz Inc – 220.00/8180, A&L Siding 3304.00 Visa – 508.45/8173, Polar – 114.36/8148, Oppegard 6.46/8176, Polar – 114.36/8178 and Agassiz – 26.50/8172. Old Business: • Update on new community center, discussion on town sign at south end and raffle funds. • Lifting station, work still in progress. • Main Avenue, Crosswalk Community Center Discussed Au Pair New Business: • County meeting at Community Center, Sept. 26 at 7:00 pm to discuss self-reliance charter. • Shaft discussed in casting. Will check in the withdrawal. • Will attend flu clinic in October. • The October meeting will take place on October 11, 2022 at 7:00 p.m. at the new community center. M/S by Jo Lynn and Kayla to adjourn the town meeting. Present: Robert McLean, Jo Lynn Dickson, Emily Goodoien, Kayla Elke and Mike Bethel. Out: Scott Hulst (September 21, 2022) 101253

]]>
The new redistricting plan will hurt residents. College Park City Council must veto it. https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-new-redistricting-plan-will-hurt-residents-college-park-city-council-must-veto-it/ Mon, 19 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-new-redistricting-plan-will-hurt-residents-college-park-city-council-must-veto-it/ The opinions expressed in the opinion columns are those of the author. As students, we have our fingerprints throughout the College Park community: we frequent the restaurants we love, we determine rent by living in off-campus housing we deem ideal, and we protest local policies that we consider unfair. Currently, College Park is deliberating on […]]]>

The opinions expressed in the opinion columns are those of the author.

As students, we have our fingerprints throughout the College Park community: we frequent the restaurants we love, we determine rent by living in off-campus housing we deem ideal, and we protest local policies that we consider unfair.

Currently, College Park is deliberating on an important policy that would extend our influence in the decision of members of the city council. The redistricting committee of this city is considering a new redistricting plan to centralize student populations in two electoral districts instead of three. While this would give students a greater opportunity to choose the board members we want, it will come at the expense of longtime College Park residents achieving what they want for the community.

Due to our low voter turnout, the transient nature of our community, and our limited perspective on the desires of permanent residents of College Park, condensing students into two districts would be woefully inefficient. This city’s redistricting commission is expected to vote against the new district maps and keep student populations spread across three districts.

We wield our power with the force of a steel sword, incisively choosing the homes, businesses and policies we want in our community. And yet, with all the influence we have within the community, we as students seem to be largely uninterested in deciding who is on the College Park council. With derisory 10% voter turnoutwe have one of the lowest voter turnout rates of any major population group living in College Park.

Low student voter turnout has several causes, including the difficulty register to vote in hometowns and the fact that some students at this university are not old enough to vote. However, on the whole, students don’t vote because we don’t care who our College Park is. the representatives of the municipal council are.

In a Tufts University survey, the number one reason enrolled students did not vote was that they didn’t like or didn’t know who the contestants were. This strongly implies that there is widespread apathy towards voting for Representatives because we do not yet fully understand the importance of the civil process, nor are we committed to establishing the habit of voting systematically, even when the choices are not very convincing.

And in a way, that’s a good thing. College Park has permanent residents who must deal with the consequences of the policies, while students stay only four years before taking the first ride they can find out of town. Why should we have more of a say in the political decision of this city than permanent residents? We have no right to displace the power that residents have over their community.

Even if we had one board member and voted regularly in elections, the voting student population changes so rapidly that it would be difficult for a single board member to adequately represent everyone’s wishes. 40,000 students at this university.

Permanent residents have desires for the community that are distinct from those of students. For example, changing housing prices in the College Park area caused by the high influx of students and new businesses may soon crowd out young families and long-term residents of the community.

Very few new developments are designed to meet the needs of residents planning to stay in College Park long term. Although having more affordable housing only benefits students for a few years, maintaining this infrastructure over time would allow families to put down roots in this city. I’m sure many long-term residents would benefit from policies such as inclusive zoning – even more so than students – to help stabilize housing prices and allow low-income residents to stay here.

Some community residents are move to their current neighborhoods, which they believe represent their needs. They do not believe that the students represent the wishes of the residents of College Park and they fear that their community voices will be silenced whether the redistricting proposals become a reality.

Students at this university play a vital role in setting community-wide policy by organizing protests, consulting directly with student council members, and stimulating the economy by patronizing local businesses.

However, we do not vote for our local or national representatives at high rates. And as such, we cannot drown out the voices of people who show up at the polls and vote. Ultimately, they are the ones who live year after year for decades with the policies of College Park.

We must give up this battle and return our swords to their sheaths. This city’s redistricting committee must maintain current district electoral maps that divide students into three districts.

Ravi Panguluri is a second-year computer science and statistics student. He can be contacted at rpangulu@umd.edu.

]]>
Morrill seeks to bring ground-level perspective to City Council https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/morrill-seeks-to-bring-ground-level-perspective-to-city-council/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 00:13:30 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/morrill-seeks-to-bring-ground-level-perspective-to-city-council/ *Editor’s note: This is the first in a five-part series featuring the candidates for Davis City Council in the Nov. 8 election. Voters in District 1 (West Davis) will choose between Councilman Dan Carson, Bapu Vaitla and Kelsey Fortune, while voters in District 4 (East Davis) will choose either Councilor Gloria Partida or Adam Morrill. […]]]>

*Editor’s note: This is the first in a five-part series featuring the candidates for Davis City Council in the Nov. 8 election. Voters in District 1 (West Davis) will choose between Councilman Dan Carson, Bapu Vaitla and Kelsey Fortune, while voters in District 4 (East Davis) will choose either Councilor Gloria Partida or Adam Morrill.

Adam Morrill brings a rather unique perspective to the city council race: He’s a city employee.

Part of his environmental compliance job with the Department of Public Works is making sure residents follow regulations around solid waste, sewage and more, and he’s even faced some hostility. from members of the public when he asked them not to pile garden waste in cycle lanes or let pipes run.

He’s been in the role since 2017, but even before that, he’s spent much of his career immersed in municipal services, from patching potholes to fighting fires to drafting environmental bylaws.

Now, Morrill seeks to bring that perspective to city governance by representing District 4 on the City Council.

“Knowing how a city works at ground level is really important,” he said.

Morrill grew up in Marin County and along with his high school sweetheart, Nicole, came to Davis for undergraduate education. After earning his geography degree from UC Davis, Morrill went to the state of Montana where he earned a master’s degree in earth science.

While at UC Davis, Morrill worked for Unitrans, first as a driver and later as a bandleader.

Over the years, during and after college, his work included stints with the Marin Municipal Water District, the State Water Resources Control Board, the UC Davis Aquatic Toxicology Laboratory and the State Department of Recreational Boating and Waterways.

But he also volunteered with the West Plainfield Fire Department, became an emergency medical technician, and after developing a love for the job, joined the Piedmont Fire Department in 2014. He had then 40 years old and had two young children with Nicole.

Morrill eventually quit that job and ended up hiring with the city of Davis in 2017.

He spends a lot of time driving around town as part of his environmental compliance work and says he’s seen the changes since he was a student.

“I see roads crumbling, trees falling… We’ve been in town 25 years and I know the roads weren’t that bad when we were driving for Unitrans,” Morrill said.

“I got fed up,” he explained. “The only purpose of the city is to take care of the essentials”, which he says he does not see happening.

Then came Measure H, the Davis Innovation and Sustainability Campus proposal, which the city council voted to put on the ballot. A larger version was turned down by voters in 2020 and the scaled-down version met the same fate earlier this summer.

Measure H, Morrill said, would have worsened traffic on Mace Boulevard.

“They weren’t going to fix it,” he said. “Just study it.”

And the project would have been more beneficial for the developers than for the public, he argued.

The project was overwhelmingly rejected, with residents of District 4, where it would have been located, particularly opposed, Morrill said.

“When that happened, I said, ‘OK, the board is just too detached from the public. “”

It was then that he decided to run for a seat on the council.

But it’s not just about DiSC, Morrill said. He believes the council spends too much time passing proclamations, is too reactionary, and is not a good steward of city funds.

He cites homelessness as an example, saying that rather than setting up the day respite center, the city should have worked with nonprofits that already provide services.

“We need to support, not duplicate efforts.”

He also thinks the city is too management-heavy, uses too many expensive consultants, and underpays its staff, leading to staff shortages.

Among his promises on his candidate site:

* Advocate for strategic infill development that will provide entry-level housing for young families and workers as well as dedicated affordable housing, without destroying prime farmland;

* Work collaboratively with local nonprofits, faith-based organizations, and the county to address major social issues;

* Provide innovative support and resources to public safety personnel to protect residents and their property, care for the homeless, and meet their mental health and addictions rehabilitation needs;

* Implement effective programs to achieve carbon neutrality by 2040 while taking concrete steps now to immediately reduce the city’s carbon footprint; and

* Encourage the private capital investment needed to revitalize downtown as a thriving environment for small businesses.

With regard to development specifically, Morrill said, the city needs to update its master plan, something he said council continues to “kick down the road.”

Rather than outlying projects like DiSC, he said, the city should focus on places like the area north of Covell Boulevard and west of County Road 102 for housing.

This, Morrill said, is a better location, surrounded as it is on three sides by other developments and it could also house a new sports park.

“Wouldn’t it be nice to have a big sports facility? He asked.

In response to a recent Sierra Club local inquiry, Morrill said he opposes any development that is not currently part of the overall plan, “whether it is good for the community or not”.

“We can no longer tolerate disparate alterations to the master plan as this will only contribute to urban sprawl,” Morrill said.

“Furthermore, we should seek to develop areas already integrated into the general plan before even considering anything else on the periphery. These areas have already been reviewed to see how they fit into the existing community.

“I’m not against development,” he said recently, but he thinks development has to be in the right place.

“It’s going to have to grow,” he said of the town, “but I don’t want sprawl.”

It means smaller and larger when it comes to accommodations, such as townhouses. And to ensure entry-level housing for families, a possible requirement in CCRs that they be owner-occupied.

Finding the right retail space is also important, Morrill said. With retail declining, downtown could become more of an entertainment district, which Morrill says suits him.

But that doesn’t mean retail can’t be added elsewhere.

He noted that a big-box store like a Lowe’s or a Bass Pro Shop could be located along the Highway 113 corridor, which is less frequented by residents but would still be accessible, both to locals and those who travel.

Such a location would be preferable, Morrill said, to a location on Mace Boulevard, which is already heavily impacted by traffic.

As for downtown itself, Morrill said, “you’re going to have to provide parking.”

It would support a parking structure in the Davis Depot lot, where the city could charge for parking. It would pay off, Morrill said, and it could entice more people to use the train for their journeys.

But limiting downtown parking, he said, would hurt businesses.

“You want people to come here.”

In sum, Morrill says he’s running for city council “because I’m a solution-oriented person.”

“I have extensive work experience in public works, health and safety and environmental services. My expertise can be used to help people and businesses in Davis.

Learn more about his campaign at www.adam4davis.org.

]]>
Lake County News, CA – Clearlake City Council to Discuss Recreation Center Feasibility Study, Consider Mutual Aid Agreement https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/lake-county-news-ca-clearlake-city-council-to-discuss-recreation-center-feasibility-study-consider-mutual-aid-agreement/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 08:55:37 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/lake-county-news-ca-clearlake-city-council-to-discuss-recreation-center-feasibility-study-consider-mutual-aid-agreement/ LAKE COUNTY, Calif. — Clearlake City Council will receive an update this week on a feasibility study for a recreation center and will consider a mutual aid agreement with several other towns in Lake and Mendocino counties. Council will meet at 6 p.m. on Thursday, September 15 in the Clearlake City Hall Council Chambers, 14050 […]]]>

LAKE COUNTY, Calif. — Clearlake City Council will receive an update this week on a feasibility study for a recreation center and will consider a mutual aid agreement with several other towns in Lake and Mendocino counties.

Council will meet at 6 p.m. on Thursday, September 15 in the Clearlake City Hall Council Chambers, 14050 Olympic Drive.

The meeting will be broadcast live on the airwaves of the city Youtube channel or the Lake County PEGTV YouTube Channel. Community members can also participate through Zoom or can attend in person.

The agenda is available here.

Comments and questions may be submitted in writing for consideration by City Council by sending them to City Clerk Melissa Swanson at This email address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

In order to give the Board sufficient time to consider your questions and comments, please submit your written comments by 4:00 p.m. on Thursday, September 15.

Each public comment emailed to the City Clerk will be read aloud by the Mayor or a staff member for up to three minutes or displayed on a screen. Public comment emails and public comment submissions received after the start of the meeting will not be included in the record.

At the start of Thursday’s meeting, the council will meet with one of the city’s September adoptable dogs, hold a swearing-in of new police department employees and present a proclamation declaring September 23, 2022 Native American Day.

Under business, council will hear a presentation and discuss the second phase of the Lake County Recreation Center feasibility study.

The council will also discuss a mutual aid agreement between the towns of Clearlake, Lakeport, Fort Bragg, Point Arena, Ukiah and Willits.

“The towns of Lake and Mendocino Counties meet regularly to discuss similar issues, share ideas and provide support and guidance where needed,” City Manager Alan Flora said in his written report to council.

“As a result of these discussions, a proposal was developed, with the town of Ukiah in the lead, for a mutual aid agreement between the six towns. The purpose of putting this agreement in place is to formalize our ability to support each other, provide reimbursement, and clarify roles and responsibilities,” Flora wrote.

In other business, the council will consider an amendment to the agreement with Pacific Gas and Electric for use of the community/senior center for emergencies not related to public safety power outages.

On the meeting’s consent agenda – items that are considered routine and usually passed on a single vote – are terms of reference; property acceptance review located at 16626 Third Ave. ; approval of Police Chief Andrew White’s response to the 2021-22 grand jury report on abandoned vehicles; maintaining authority to implement and use teleconferencing accessibility to hold public meetings pursuant to Assembly Bill 361; approval of response to grand jury report 2021-22, “Not Your Grandfather’s Dump”; acceptance of the filing of the 2022 Local Agencies Biennial Notice regarding amendments to the Conflict of Interest Code.

The board will also hold an in camera session to discuss two potential litigation cases.

Email Elizabeth Larson at This email address is protected from spam. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow her on Twitter, @ERLarson, or Lake County News, @LakeCoNews.

]]>
Vineland NJ City Council targets homeless sleeping and camping https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/vineland-nj-city-council-targets-homeless-sleeping-and-camping/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 09:07:53 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/vineland-nj-city-council-targets-homeless-sleeping-and-camping/ VINELAND — Issues with seemingly homeless people using sidewalks and other transit areas to sleep, or something hygienically worse, is prompting the city to toughen its regulations. The city promises fines to violators found sleeping, camping or abusing rights of way, but only if initial offers of assistance such as transportation to a shelter are […]]]>

VINELAND — Issues with seemingly homeless people using sidewalks and other transit areas to sleep, or something hygienically worse, is prompting the city to toughen its regulations.

The city promises fines to violators found sleeping, camping or abusing rights of way, but only if initial offers of assistance such as transportation to a shelter are denied.

But council members who took a first look at the proposed bylaws on Tuesday night weren’t particularly hopeful that they would be as effective as needed.

Councilman Paul Spinelli said the city already has legal approvals from many landowners to remove homeless people on their behalf. These interventions only work in a limited way, he said.

“You move them from point A,” Spinelli said. “They go to point B. When they move to point B, they move to point C. Eventually, they come back to point A, again.”

“They’re just going around in circles,” Council President Elizabeth Arthur said.

City attorney Richard Tonetta said sleeping in a right-of-way can be dangerous. More tightening of ordinances is also to come.

“We wanted to clarify that you cannot sleep or camp or anything like that in the public right-of-way,” Tonetta said. “So this is one of many new ordinances that will alter and amend the Streets and Roads chapter of our book.”

Spinelli said a business in the area earlier Tuesday saw someone undressing, preparing to defecate on the sidewalk. The police arrived and chased the person away, but the councilman said this kind of incident should result in more than a ‘move out’ order.

]]>
Braxton Winston elected interim mayor of Charlotte by city council; four sworn council members – WSOC TV https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/braxton-winston-elected-interim-mayor-of-charlotte-by-city-council-four-sworn-council-members-wsoc-tv/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 00:09:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/braxton-winston-elected-interim-mayor-of-charlotte-by-city-council-four-sworn-council-members-wsoc-tv/ CHARLOTTE — Councilman Braxton Winston was chosen by his peers as interim mayor of Charlotte at the first meeting of Charlotte’s new city council on Tuesday night. The council also swore in four council members; familiar faces Lawana Slack-Mayfield and James “Smudgie” Mitchell, and newcomers Marjorie Molina and Dante Anderson. Winston’s election as mayor pro […]]]>

CHARLOTTE — Councilman Braxton Winston was chosen by his peers as interim mayor of Charlotte at the first meeting of Charlotte’s new city council on Tuesday night.

The council also swore in four council members; familiar faces Lawana Slack-Mayfield and James “Smudgie” Mitchell, and newcomers Marjorie Molina and Dante Anderson.

Winston’s election as mayor pro tem – by unanimous council vote – was the first official move for the new group and it was not without drama.

On Monday, Channel 9’s Jonathan Lowe and Joe Bruno heard there was support for the council to oppose the usual trend – electing the top voter in the council’s overall race as mayor pro tem – in favor of selection of a different board member.

The mayor pro tem fills important roles in the public and the private sector. In public, the mayor pro tem replaces the mayor in the event of the mayor’s absence. In private, the mayor pro tem serves as the de facto whip, finding out where council members stand on issues and whether there is support.

In the July elections, Dimple Ajmera got the most votes in the overall race and let it be known she wanted the job. She received a nomination from council member Molina, but declined the position.

“As the will of the voters was the usual procedure, I became interested in the work of the (mayor pro tem). But there comes a time when we have to decide whether to lead or help someone else lead with a unified voice,” Ajmera said after the appointment. “I have decided to help council member Winston become the next interim mayor of Charlotte.”

On Tuesday afternoon, Winston was identified as a leading candidate for the role with the backing of at least two Charlotte City Council members, a source close to the vote told Political Beat’s Joe Bruno.

It is only the second time that the person who received the most votes in the overall race has not been elected interim mayor. Ajmera edged out Winston by 706 votes in the fall election.

Community leaders including Harvey Gantt, Hugh McColl and Malcomb Coley released a letter backing Ajmera for the job.

In 2015, the Charlotte City Council endorsed Vi Lyles over Julie Eiselt for the position of interim mayor. Eiselt finished ahead of Lyles, but backed the current mayor for the job. This was Eiselt’s first term.

>>> At 11 p.m. on Channel 9, Political Beat’s Joe Bruno will have an interview with Winston and more reactions from the first meeting of the new board.

(WATCH BELOW: City Council set to swear in new members; leadership position remains in question)

]]>