Town board – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 15:03:52 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Town board – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ 32 32 City council hears development code updates and takes first step in new trail connection https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-hears-development-code-updates-and-takes-first-step-in-new-trail-connection/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 23:18:49 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-hears-development-code-updates-and-takes-first-step-in-new-trail-connection/ At the regular Berthoud board meeting on November 23, the board voted to authorize a service agreement to begin design work to connect the current trail system to Loveland. Council also heard a detailed presentation regarding the proposed changes and revisions to the city’s development code. Deputy City Administrator Jeremy Olinger briefed the board on […]]]>

At the regular Berthoud board meeting on November 23, the board voted to authorize a service agreement to begin design work to connect the current trail system to Loveland. Council also heard a detailed presentation regarding the proposed changes and revisions to the city’s development code.

Deputy City Administrator Jeremy Olinger briefed the board on a small portion of the much larger Colorado Front Range Trail, which Olinger called “a backbone throughout the front area,” which will extend eventually up to the Wyoming border in the north and will travel south into Boulder County as well as travel east into Weld County.

The city approached the board to seek permission from city administrator Chris Kirk to enter into a service agreement with engineering firm JUB consultants to partner with the city’s trail project. from Loveland on a section of trail north of town.

According to information provided to the Trustees, “The 2018 Berthoud Unified Trails Master Plan identified a connection between the trail networks between the Town of Berthoud and the Town of Loveland north of the Heron Lakes development on County Road 14. Since then, Berthoud staff and Loveland staff have met annually to coordinate the progress of the trail system, locations and partnership grant opportunities. Through these conversations and meetings, staff learned that the Town of Loveland has started the process to find the viability of creating a trail through southwest Loveland along the Eagle Vista Natural Area and would end at CR14.

The Berthoud portion of the trail will join an existing trail at Heron Lakes Parkway, across from the neighborhood maintenance facility just south of County Road 14, will head west along CR14 before joining the Loveland portion of the trail at the south end of the Eagle Vista Natural Area. The costs are estimated at just under $ 23,000; Kirk explained that crossing the CR14 trailhead is a “fairly significant” engineering project due to grading, surveying, natural area drainage protection, and so on.

The service agreement calls for 30% of the design work to be completed, which Olinger says will be completed in February or March. Kirk later said, “Once we hit that 30% design level, now is a great time to seek grants,” saying these funds are available through several avenues that Berthoud and Loveland will pursue to at least cover. part of the costs of the project.

After the presentation, the board voted unanimously, 6-0 with director Tim Hardy absent, to allow Kirk to go ahead.

As part of the city-approved master plan, presented in 2020 and approved last summer, the decision was made to move to a so-called “form / new planner” approach to development guidelines.

While the details of the development code revisions are far too complex and detailed to be described in this space (interested residents are encouraged to check the city’s website for more details), the proposed plan, “created a new vision based on a transect of uses, from rural to suburban, to urban commercial and downtown. The focus of each transect was on the transport pattern and the overall design and location of buildings in each area, rather than the previous use-based approach which relied on function as a guiding principle, ”according to presentation by Curt Freese, Director of Community Development for Berthoud.

Further, according to information provided by Freese, “The goal of the new neighborhoods is that any new rezoning or annexation be placed in one of the new zoning neighborhoods that match the overall plan. The existing zoning districts and the subdivisions acquired in these districts will remain in their current zoning district. Mountain Avenue overlay

was created using the same design principles and will remain in place for the properties

within its limits without change.

Since the presentation was the first hearing on the matter, no action was taken, but the trustees will digest the information presented before holding a public hearing and possibly voting on the changes in a public hearing during the next meeting.

During the reports, at the end of the meeting, the trustees congratulated Kirk, recreation director Amanda Gustafson and city staff for opening the recreation center. While there, Mayor Will Karspeck said: “I had a pretty bad experience on the opening morning because of the speeches from a few of your guys”, as he waved to Mayor Pro Tem Maureen Dower and administrator Jeff Hindman.

The mayor continued, “That morning was meant to be about unity instead it turned into a matter of total division and I think it was really inappropriate.” During their speeches at the grand opening, Dower and Hindman made pointed remarks to Karspeck and others in town, who had expressed their displeasure with the board’s decision to use certificates of attendance. to finance development while Karspeck, in his prepared remarks at the ceremony, took on a more harmonious and unifying tone. “I’m glad it’s done and I think, and we all think it’s going to be good for the community so hopefully we can move on,” Karspeck said before closing the meeting.

The Town of Berthoud YouTube page, found by going to www.youtube.com and searching for “Ville de Berthoud” contains full recordings of the last two board meetings with plans to add future meetings to the page .

The next city council meeting will be on December 14th.


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Rhinebeck City Council agrees to partially fund Hudson 7 coordinator – Daily Freeman https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/rhinebeck-city-council-agrees-to-partially-fund-hudson-7-coordinator-daily-freeman/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 15:57:16 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/rhinebeck-city-council-agrees-to-partially-fund-hudson-7-coordinator-daily-freeman/ RHINEBECK, NY – City Council has approved a request from Hudson 7 to hire a coordinator to look after the group’s affairs and keep tabs on activities that could affect municipal water systems along the Hudson River . Approval was given in a videoconference meeting on Monday, November 22. Officials said the city will contribute […]]]>

RHINEBECK, NY – City Council has approved a request from Hudson 7 to hire a coordinator to look after the group’s affairs and keep tabs on activities that could affect municipal water systems along the Hudson River .

Approval was given in a videoconference meeting on Monday, November 22. Officials said the city will contribute $ 2,500 towards the creation of the post.

“Most of the funding is coming from (the counties of Holland and Ulster) and the details need to be worked out,” said supervisor Elizabeth Spinzia.


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City Council wrap: hometown hero tribute, budget passed, hearings and more https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-wrap-hometown-hero-tribute-budget-passed-hearings-and-more/ Sun, 21 Nov 2021 15:01:48 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-wrap-hometown-hero-tribute-budget-passed-hearings-and-more/ Riverhead City Council greeted retired Master Sergeant Kevin Carrick of Aquebogue at its regular monthly meeting this week. Carrick, 62, was named Grand Marshal of the New York City Veterans Day Parade this year. See the story: “A hero from his hometown shines in the national spotlight” (12 Nov) Carrick was accompanied to the city […]]]>

Riverhead City Council greeted retired Master Sergeant Kevin Carrick of Aquebogue at its regular monthly meeting this week.

Carrick, 62, was named Grand Marshal of the New York City Veterans Day Parade this year. See the story: “A hero from his hometown shines in the national spotlight” (12 Nov)

Carrick was accompanied to the city council meeting with his wife Karen and his parents Ginny and Darrell Carrick from Riverhead. Council members thanked him for his service and presented him with a proclamation commemorating the honor of being named Grand Marshal of the New York Parade.

2022 operating budget unanimously adopted

Also at its meeting on Tuesday evening, city council unanimously adopted an operating budget of $ 100.1 million for 2022, without modifying the provisional budget proposed by supervisor Yvette Aguiar on September 30. The budget reduces the city’s tax rate by 1.4%, or 80 cents per $ 1,000 of assessed value, from $ 58 to $ 57.20 per $ 1,000 of assessed value.

The board did not hear any comments from the public during its budget hearing on November 3 and received a written comment, made by Bryan Carroll of Miller Place, who voiced several complaints about the proposed budget and the budget process, including the failure of the city council to have a department Heads of schools discuss their budget requests in a public forum, the reduction in the budget of the highways department and the budget ‘overdependence’ on “One-off deals like the Community Benefits Agreement” rather than recurring revenue streams. Carroll briefly served as budget manager for former supervisor Laura Jens-Smith. The board did not respond to his comments before the vote.

“I want to thank the supervisor for giving us a budget without a tax increase. Our CFO, Mr. Rothaar, and our department heads worked with the supervisor and with the board of directors and created this budget and not add to the burden on taxpayers, ”City Councilor Tim Hubbard said before voting .

“It was a good budget,” Aguiar said. “We gave increases as needed to our employees and we secured – we cut spending in some areas. Increase – an increase in spending usually means that you have rendered more service to the taxpayer. And we did too. And we haven’t lost any service. And most of the cities have laid off people and we haven’t. So thanks for the board for the support – those of you who supported my budget. I really appreciate it and see you next year, ”Aguiar said before voting yes.

Council hears requests for federal community development funds

Also on Tuesday, city council held a public hearing to solicit community input on the allocation of federal block grant funds for community development over the coming year. The Town of Riverhead expects to receive approximately $ 200,000 in federal block grants for community development in fiscal year 2022.

CDBG funds can be used, and have already been used for a variety of projects that benefit low and moderate income people, aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or the scourge and / or meet a need for ‘a particular emergency. Several nonprofits that provide services to the Riverhead community applied for funding during the hearing, including the Riverhead Community Awareness Program, Maureen’s Haven Homeless Outreach, the Butterfly Effect Project, Bread and More Kitchen, Church of the Harvest Food Pantry, Open Arms Care Center, and La Retraite. All have already received funding from CDBG through the Town of Riverhead.

The hearing file on the allocation of Riverhead Community Development Grant funds for 2022 remains open for written comments until December 17 at 4:30 p.m. Written comments are to be submitted to the Riverhead Community Development Department, 200 Howell Avenue, Riverhead, New York 11901.

Audience set to drive-in restaurant

City council on Tuesday assumed lead agency status, issued a declaration of non-significance, and scheduled a public hearing on Inheritance Development Co.’s special permit application for a drive-thru restaurant and food store. detail on a 1.8 acre site on the north side of Highway 58 just west of Osborn Avenue.

The proposed site plan, which requires Planning Council approval, currently represents a 5,000 square foot retail store and 2,238 square foot, 74 seat restaurant.

Car use is only permitted with special authorization from the town hall.

The action was classified as a Type I action last year under the State Environmental Quality Review Act.

The site map has been developed to accommodate a Sonic drive-in restaurant project. The plan has been around since 2015 or 2016, Greg Bergman, planning assistant, told the board during its November 10 working session. The plan has been revised to eliminate the need for any discrepancies, Bergman said.

The planning board, which also circulated a request to assume lead agency status on-demand, was concerned about the potential for traffic congestion resulting from use and its impact on ambulances leaving the adjacent headquarters of the Riverhead Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Bergman said. The site map shows an entrance to the site on Osborn Avenue, in addition to an entrance and exit on Route 58.

A traffic report prepared by the applicant’s traffic engineering consultant states that use “would result in slightly increased delays at the intersection of Old Country Road and Osborn Avenue, but would not degrade service levels to this intersection ”, according to the resolution of the city council adopted. Tuesday.

The city council has set a public hearing on December 7 on the application for a special permit for car use. The hearing is scheduled for 2:15 p.m.

Charter school plan hearing for Northville school

City council also assumed lead agency status on Tuesday, issued a declaration of non-significance, and scheduled a public hearing on the Riverhead Charter School’s special permit application to convert a two-story building on Sound Avenue in Northville to school. Use is only permitted with special authorization from the town hall.

The school is intended for use as a high school by the Riverhead Charter School and is said to have an enrollment of around 105 students, according to city documents.

The city council has scheduled a public hearing on December 7 on the application for the special permit. The hearing is scheduled to start at 2:10 p.m.

Change order for the Town Square demonstration project

City Council, on the recommendation of the City Engineer, approved a change order of $ 78,889 for the demolition contract awarded to J. Petrocelli Contracting for the demolition of 117 and 121 East Main Street. Both buildings were purchased by the city for demolition to make way for the proposed city square.

According to the resolution approving the change order, “During the demolition work on 117 and 121 East Main Street and the removal of some layers of flooring, it was found that some of the flooring materials contained of asbestos and as such the Town of Riverhead is required by law to have this removed by a licensed asbestos removal company.

The supporting documents attached to the resolution indicate that approximately 5,600 square feet of floor tile and 5,600 square feet of adhesive found at 121 East Main Street contain asbestos and approximately 100 linear feet of pipe casing in the first and second floors of 117 East Main Street contain asbestos.

Staff changes

Planning Assistant Greg Bergman has been provisionally promoted to the position of Planner, effective November 22.

Bergman has been employed as a planning aid since August 29, 2016. The promotion is accompanied by an increase of $ 12,700. His new salary, under the city’s contract with the Public Service Employees Association, will be $ 78,433 per year, the city council resolution says.

The county civil service department has reviewed Bergman’s duties and responsibilities and reclassified his position as a planner, according to the resolution, which says the county agency issued an interim memorandum to allow Bergman to be appointed to this post.

Cheryl Franco of Aquebogue has been appointed Budget Officer and Chief of Staff in the Supervisor’s Office with an annual salary of $ 62,500. The city council on Tuesday ratified his appointment by the supervisor as of November 10. Franco fills the vacant position created by the appointment of Lisa Richards as Assistant Tax Collector.

Donna Sadowsky, secretary in the supervisor’s office, resigned on November 5. Sadowsky offered to work part-time, up to 16 hours a week, for a month to train a new secretary, who has yet to be appointed.

Tanesha Clinton has been appointed part-time courier driver at an hourly rate of $ 14.50.

Madeline Cavaluzzi is retiring from her post as goalkeeper as of December 17th.

Support local journalism.
More than ever, the survival of quality local journalism depends on your support. Our community is facing unprecedented economic disruption and the future of many small businesses is threatened, including our own. It takes time and resources to provide this service. We are a small family business and we will do everything in our power to keep it going. But now more than ever, we will depend on your support to keep going. Support RiverheadLOCAL today. You depend on us to stay informed and we depend on you to make our work possible.


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Greenburgh City Council Implements New COVID-19 Restrictions https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/greenburgh-city-council-implements-new-covid-19-restrictions/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 18:49:11 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/greenburgh-city-council-implements-new-covid-19-restrictions/ GREENBURGH, NY – There will be new restrictions on coronaviruses at Greenburgh city council meetings – as the pandemic continues. Supervisor Paul Feiner said that for all future city council meetings, those who wish to attend the meeting in person must register in advance. “We will limit attendance to our auditorium to fewer people to […]]]>

GREENBURGH, NY – There will be new restrictions on coronaviruses at Greenburgh city council meetings – as the pandemic continues.

Supervisor Paul Feiner said that for all future city council meetings, those who wish to attend the meeting in person must register in advance.

“We will limit attendance to our auditorium to fewer people to reduce the possibility of the spread of COVID-19,” he said.

All participants must wear masks.

All other rows in the auditorium will be blocked off, as will all other seats, Feiner said.

Those who enter the auditorium will have their temperatures taken in the lobby, he said.

To pre-register for a city council meeting, send an email to publiccomment@greenburghny.com.

Feiner said anyone can join the meetings through Zoom and send a public comment via email.

He told Patch the new restrictions were due to the board’s concern that people were sitting next to each other and that almost all of the seats had been filled in a recent meeting. .

“Pre-registration is being requested,” Feiner said, “because we don’t want people showing up and then being told they have to leave.”

He said he continues to believe that only those who are vaccinated should be allowed to attend our live city council meetings.

“The unvaccinated should participate remotely,” Feiner said.

This recommendation has not yet been adopted by the council and will be discussed again during the working session on Tuesday.

The next Greenburgh City Council meeting will be Monday at 7:30 p.m.


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Rib Mountain Town Board of Directors to Adopt Backyard Chicken Proposal https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/rib-mountain-town-board-of-directors-to-adopt-backyard-chicken-proposal/ Thu, 11 Nov 2021 18:36:33 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/rib-mountain-town-board-of-directors-to-adopt-backyard-chicken-proposal/ By Shereen Siewert Rib Mountain City Council will make a final decision next week on whether to allow residents to keep chickens and other small farm animals on private property, following a public hearing on Wednesday. The public hearing took place at a meeting of the Planning Commission, whose members participated in a nearly 90-minute […]]]>

By Shereen Siewert

Rib Mountain City Council will make a final decision next week on whether to allow residents to keep chickens and other small farm animals on private property, following a public hearing on Wednesday.

The public hearing took place at a meeting of the Planning Commission, whose members participated in a nearly 90-minute session in which they heard from residents and discussed the parameters of the proposed order.

Earlier this year, Rib Mountain resident Emily Ramthum presented a petition signed by about 60 residents in support of allowing chickens on residential land, according to city documents. Some neighboring communities already allow the breeding of these animals on private property. In Wausau, the city approved backyard chickens in 2017.

The Planning Commission discussed the matter on July 13 and recommended a public hearing before moving forward. Rib Mountain staff spoke in favor of allowing chickens on residential lots, as well as changing the ordinance to include other animals that would have negligible impacts on neighbors, such as ducks.

The current code does not allow these animals to be kept at Rib Mountain, which has an average area of ​​over 1/3 acre.

“The impact of this use on neighbors would be negligible under most circumstances,” Jared Wehner, director of community development, wrote in a cover sheet of Wednesday’s meeting agenda. “Staff have reviewed the draft text and believe the ordinance is designed to best suit the city. “

If this turns out to be a general nuisance, the code can be changed in the future, Wehner wrote.

Rib Mountain Town’s board of directors will vote on the proposal on November 16.


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A special meeting of the city council called to “order and demand” that the chief of the road collects the fallen leaves https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/a-special-meeting-of-the-city-council-called-to-order-and-demand-that-the-chief-of-the-road-collects-the-fallen-leaves/ https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/a-special-meeting-of-the-city-council-called-to-order-and-demand-that-the-chief-of-the-road-collects-the-fallen-leaves/#respond Tue, 09 Nov 2021 20:48:19 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/a-special-meeting-of-the-city-council-called-to-order-and-demand-that-the-chief-of-the-road-collects-the-fallen-leaves/ Riverhead City Council will “order and demand” that Highway Superintendent George Woodson conduct loose leaf pickup this year in a resolution to be implemented at a special city council meeting tomorrow at 10 a.m., according to a notice. meeting posted on the city’s website today. . The dispute between Woodson and the board of directors […]]]>

Riverhead City Council will “order and demand” that Highway Superintendent George Woodson conduct loose leaf pickup this year in a resolution to be implemented at a special city council meeting tomorrow at 10 a.m., according to a notice. meeting posted on the city’s website today. .

The dispute between Woodson and the board of directors over the pickup has been going on for years. Woodson argued that pickup is not a road service function, but a remediation function. Members of the city’s board of directors argue that the ministry has been doing this since 1962, that it has enough reserve funds to do the pickup, and that the pickup benefits seniors who can’t hire landscapers or work. leave to be picked up by the city’s garbage collection contractor. [See prior coverage]

The public has the opportunity to comment on the resolution in person at City Hall prior to the council vote. Residents can speak out on any issues of concern after city council votes on the resolution.

Woodson has previously said he based his opinion on the opinion of David Orr, the director of New York’s local technical assistance program, which is part of the Federal Highway Administration and heads Cornell University. Orr said the dispute boils down to whether or not the pickup benefits the city’s freeways.

He also said the council has the power to ask the superintendent to do additional work that is not part of a road function, but the road budget must be reimbursed for its cost. Woodson said he would do the pickup if the roads department was reimbursed for the work, which he said totaled around $ 400,000. It is not clear whether the city council will transfer money from the general fund to reimburse the department.

In the past, Woodson has caved in as December approaches. However, last year he agreed to take care of the pickup, with the understanding that the roads department would not be responsible for it in 2021.

Woodson is retiring from his post at the end of this year. His deputy, Mike Zaleski, was elected to replace him last week on the Republican list.

Woodson did not return calls for comment until this article was published.

Support local journalism.
More than ever, the survival of quality local journalism depends on your support. Our community is facing unprecedented economic disruption and the future of many small businesses is threatened, including our own. It takes time and resources to provide this service. We are a small family business and we will do everything in our power to keep it going. But now more than ever, we will depend on your support to keep going. Support RiverheadLOCAL today. You depend on us to stay informed and we depend on you to make our work possible.


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Alamosa News | The administrator of Del Norte censored by the city council https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/alamosa-news-the-administrator-of-del-norte-censored-by-the-city-council/ Tue, 09 Nov 2021 06:18:57 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/alamosa-news-the-administrator-of-del-norte-censored-by-the-city-council/ NORTH LED – Del Norte City Council recently approved censorship of Administrator Laura Anzalone for what has been described as professional misconduct. Anzalone denies doing anything that would justify the censorship, has retained the services of a lawyer and is calling for the censorship to be removed. A seven-page letter submitted to the city of […]]]>

NORTH LED – Del Norte City Council recently approved censorship of Administrator Laura Anzalone for what has been described as professional misconduct. Anzalone denies doing anything that would justify the censorship, has retained the services of a lawyer and is calling for the censorship to be removed.

A seven-page letter submitted to the city of Del Norte by attorney Luis A. Corchado, who represents Anzalone, states that the city went against the laws and open meeting procedure when approving censorship.

“Administrator Anzalone has asked me to contact you regarding the October 18, 2021 Board censorship of Administrator Laura Anzalone,” Corchado wrote in the letter. “As explained in more detail below, by enacting censorship, the Council has abused its discretion and overstepped its authority.”

Anzalone sat down with Del Norte’s prospector and explained what had happened and why she was pushing back against censorship.

City staff said they were advised by the city’s lawyer not to comment on the case. Del Norte City Manager Bernadette Martinez said the city could not make a statement at this time by legal counsel and that Del Norte Mayor Chris Trujillo was unavailable for comment at the time of the publication.

During her three years as a trustee, Anzalone wondered how and why the city did things and said it had rubbed some city staff and other trustees the wrong way.

The examples given by Anzalone were that she had offered to look at the city’s hiring practices and ask how the city meets ordinances such as performance review requirements. She also asked why the public is not always allowed to speak at city council meetings when they are allowed on specific agenda items.

According to the letter, Anzalone was informed by the mayor of Del Norte, Chris Trujillo, that he “had the votes to remove her” on October 5, which was the first time Anzalone had heard of his intention to do so. revoke.

The letter further states that Trujillo gave no reason or justification for his statement or attempt to have Anzalone removed from his elected position on the board. In subsequent meetings that followed throughout October, no specific explanation was ever given to Anzalone, no matter how many times she asked for it.

“On October 13, 2021, at a regular board meeting, the board scheduled a public hearing on the revocation issue for November 2, 2021. The board did not discuss the reasons for the revocation hearing and did not discuss the reasons for the revocation hearing. still has not provided accusations to the trustee. Anzalone, ”the letter reads.

Another special meeting was scheduled for October 18. The agenda shows only two items, an executive session under revised Colorado Law 24-6-402 (4) (b) to receive legal advice related to the removal of the trustee and the decision of the board to ‘administration. after the executive session. It was during the October 18 meeting that it was first proposed to censor administrator Anzalone by a recommendation made by the board of directors which was unanimously approved.

The following three reasons for the censorship were finally read after the executive session ended on October 18: “The board of directors of the town of Del Norte received credible information from town staff that administrator Laura Anzalone committed the following acts:

• Administrator Anzalone took it upon herself to assume the duties of the Code Enforcement Officer by encouraging citizens to file complaints about the Del Norte Lighting Ordinance and hampered procedure and protocol of the city code enforcement officer, which made it difficult for him to carry out his essential tasks. functions which creates confusion in the public as to who has the power to enforce the city code. In doing so, it engaged the City’s responsibility for acting outside the scope of its appropriate authority.

• Administrator Anzalone attempted to call a special board meeting by contacting the city clerk and using the following language “We as trustees … request a special meeting in the purpose of discussing the procedure of the city and the administrator. appointed … ”This correspondence did not have the consent of the other directors of the board, was misleading, and such a meeting would normally be a working meeting of the board, which, when attempted to be called between regular meetings , could only be summoned by the Mayor.

• Trustee Anzalone told city clerk / administrator that there should be a replacement of city staff every few years, making their job performance more difficult, their tenure uncertain, putting unnecessary stress on their personal lives and creating unnecessary tension in the work environment.

Anzalone’s lawyer stressed in the letter that these were matters for a trustee.

Administrator Anzalone calls for the repeal of censorship through his legal advisor. According to the letter submitted by the attorney, the board has until Nov. 10 to respond and can do so through the regular meeting platform or by calling a special hearing to consider the attorney’s proposal.

“I’m angry and yet all I want is our moral compass to be aligned,” Anzalone told the prospector. “I want us to be fair and I want us to be fair. I want us to serve the community without personal assault or biased information. We must obey the law and we must be able to ask questions and see our future without repercussions. ”

The next regular meeting of Del Norte City Council is scheduled for November 10 at 6 p.m. Agendas are posted at Town Hall and online at www.delnortecolorado.com.


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Breidenstein elected to West Seneca City Council | New https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/breidenstein-elected-to-west-seneca-city-council-new/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/breidenstein-elected-to-west-seneca-city-council-new/ SALAMANCA – Robert Breidenstein, superintendent of the central school district of the city of Salamanca, was elected to the city council of West Seneca on November 2. Receiving 6,864 votes, Breidenstein led the field of four candidates, with the two candidates with the most votes being elected. Breidenstein announced on October 5 that he would […]]]>

SALAMANCA – Robert Breidenstein, superintendent of the central school district of the city of Salamanca, was elected to the city council of West Seneca on November 2.

Receiving 6,864 votes, Breidenstein led the field of four candidates, with the two candidates with the most votes being elected.

Breidenstein announced on October 5 that he would retire as superintendent of Salamanca at the end of the school year in June, after a decade in the district and more than 30 years in public education. He said running for public office had always been an ambitious goal for him and the timing seemed right.

“For a few months it will be busy, crazy and hectic, but that’s kinda normal for me,” he told reporters on Friday. “I can’t wait to move from one opportunity to another similar to the role I have held for almost 32 years. “

Breidenstein said his long-standing relationship in Albany and Washington, DC after years of working with state and federal lawmakers on public education matters, would be a major factor in serving on West Seneca City Council. and could help finance local public service projects.

“And then, obviously, by listening and making sure that we make good long-term decisions – whether it’s people-related or strategic planning – there are a lot of similarities between the two roles,” a- he declared.

Breidenstein has said one of his tenets is to listen before you act, so he looks forward to listening to his constituents as he learns more about this new role. He said there will be plenty of workouts and readings he’ll be diving into in the coming months, but that’s okay with it.

“I can’t wait to start in January,” he added.

Breidenstein lives in West Seneca with his wife Lisa and their son Bobby. He had been an administrator in the school district and a volunteer in several community groups.


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Prospector Del Norte | The administrator of Del Norte censored by the city council https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prospector-del-norte-the-administrator-of-del-norte-censored-by-the-city-council/ https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prospector-del-norte-the-administrator-of-del-norte-censored-by-the-city-council/#respond Thu, 04 Nov 2021 19:00:57 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prospector-del-norte-the-administrator-of-del-norte-censored-by-the-city-council/ DEL NORTE – Del Norte City Council recently approved censorship of administrator Laura Anzalone for what has been described as professional misconduct. Anzalone denies doing anything that would justify the censorship, hired a lawyer and calls for the censorship to be removed. A seven-page letter submitted to the city of Del Norte by attorney Luis […]]]>

DEL NORTE – Del Norte City Council recently approved censorship of administrator Laura Anzalone for what has been described as professional misconduct. Anzalone denies doing anything that would justify the censorship, hired a lawyer and calls for the censorship to be removed.

A seven-page letter submitted to the city of Del Norte by attorney Luis A. Corchado, who represents Anzalone, states that the city violated the laws and procedures relating to open meetings when approving the censorship.

“Administrator Anzalone has asked me to contact you regarding the October 18, 2021 board censorship against administrator Laura Anzalone,” Corchado wrote in the letter. “As explained in more detail below, by enacting censorship, the Council has abused its discretion and overstepped its authority.”

Anzalone sat down with Del Norte’s prospector and spoke about what happened and why she is pushing back against censorship.

City staff said they were advised by the city’s lawyer not to comment on the case. Del Norte City Manager Bernadette Martinez said the city could not make a statement at this time by legal counsel and that Del Norte Mayor Chris Trujillo was unavailable for comment at the time of the publication.

During her three years as a trustee, Anzalone wondered how and why the city did things and said it had rubbed some city staff and other trustees the wrong way.

The examples given by Anzalone were that she had offered to look at the city’s hiring practices and ask how the city meets ordinances such as performance review requirements. She also asked why the public is not always allowed to speak at city council meetings when they are allowed on specific agenda items.

According to the letter, Anzalone was informed by the mayor of Del Norte, Chris Trujillo, that he “had the votes to remove her” on October 5, which was the first time Anzalone had heard of his intention to do so. revoke.

The letter further states that Trujillo gave no reason or justification for his statement or attempt to have Anzalone removed from his elected position on the board. In subsequent meetings that followed throughout October, no specific explanation was ever given to Anzalone, no matter how many times she asked for it.

“On October 13, 2021, at a regular board meeting, the board scheduled a public hearing on the revocation issue for November 2, 2021. The board did not discuss the reasons for the revocation hearing and did not discuss the reasons for the revocation hearing. still has not provided accusations to the trustee. Anzalone, ”the letter reads.

Another special meeting was scheduled for October 18. The agenda shows only two items, an executive session under revised Colorado Law 24-6-402 (4) (b) to receive legal advice related to the removal of the trustee and the decision of the board to ‘administration. after the executive session. It was during the October 18 meeting that it was first proposed to censor administrator Anzalone by a recommendation made by the board of directors which was unanimously approved.

The following three reasons for the censorship were finally read after the executive session ended on October 18: “The board of directors of the town of Del Norte received credible information from town staff that administrator Laura Anzalone committed the following acts:

  • Administrator Anzalone took it upon herself to assume the duties of the Code Enforcement Officer by encouraging citizens to file complaints about the Del Norte Lighting Ordinance and hampered the procedure and protocol of the city code enforcement officer, which made it difficult for him to perform his essential functions. which confuses the public as to who has the power to enforce the city code. In doing so, it engaged the responsibility of the City for having acted outside its authority.
  • Administrator Anzalone attempted to call a special board meeting by contacting the city clerk and using the following language: “We as trustees … are asking for a special meeting in the purpose of discussing the procedure of the city and the appointed administrators. … “This correspondence did not have the consent of the other directors of the board, was misleading, and such a meeting would normally be a working meeting of the board, which, when it attempted to be called between regular meetings, could only be summoned by the mayor.
  • Trustee Anzalone told city clerk / administrator that there should be a replacement of city staff every few years, which would make their job performance more difficult, their tenure uncertain, placing unnecessary stress on their personal lives and creating unnecessary tensions in the working environment. .

Anzalone’s lawyer stressed in the letter that these were matters for a trustee.

Administrator Anzalone calls for the repeal of censorship through his legal advisor. According to the letter submitted by the attorney, the board has until Nov. 10 to respond and can do so through the regular meeting platform or by calling a special hearing to consider the attorney’s proposal.

“I’m angry and yet all I want is our moral compass to be aligned,” Anzalone told the prospector. “I want us to be fair and I want us to be fair. I want us to serve the community without personal assault or biased information. We must obey the law and we must be able to ask questions and see our future without repercussions. “

The next regular meeting of Del Norte City Council is scheduled for November 10 at 6 p.m. Agendas are posted at Town Hall and online at www.delnortecolorado.com.


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The race for Monroe Town Board https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-race-for-monroe-town-board/ https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-race-for-monroe-town-board/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 10:37:01 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-race-for-monroe-town-board/ Outgoing Monroe Town board members Mary Bingham and Rick Colon, both Democrats, are being challenged by Dorey Houle, a Republican who serves as a Trustee for Monroe Village. Photo news asked each candidate these questions: 1. Personal Information. IE employment, community service, some people include their families, etc. 2. Why are you running for office […]]]>

Outgoing Monroe Town board members Mary Bingham and Rick Colon, both Democrats, are being challenged by Dorey Houle, a Republican who serves as a Trustee for Monroe Village.

Photo news asked each candidate these questions:

1. Personal Information. IE employment, community service, some people include their families, etc.

2. Why are you running for office and why should people vote for you?

3. What is the most critical problem for the city or town and what can be done about it?

Here are their responses:

Marie bingham

My husband Bill and I have lived in Monroe for 38 years. We have two grown children and four grandchildren. I have worked for a local hospital in their acute care / rehabilitation department for 25 years.

I am running for re-election for Monroe City Council because I believe I can better represent the residents of our community. When I moved to Monroe it was a very suburban community. Over time I have seen Monroe grow up to be more suburban / urban. I understand the need to balance growth and limit potential impacts on traffic, water, air quality and our schools. My previous experience on the Monroe Planning Council and Conservation Commission gives me the knowledge that will allow Monroe to remain a community of which residents can be proud.

I think the most critical issue our city faces is the availability of affordable housing for seniors and young professionals. I voted for a Conservation Cluster Residential Floating Zone that will allow 20 percent of the units to be used as labor housing and 15 percent of the units for those 55 and over. This zoning change will lead to more housing choices and give our seniors and young professionals more opportunities to stay in Monroe.

Rick colon

My wife and I moved to Monroe when we got married for the first time in December 1981. In 1990 I had a major career change and started working for the Corrections Department of the New York State. I recently retired in March 2019 with just over 29 years of service.

I believe that running for public office is a serious commitment, but also a responsibility to your family, neighbors and community. It’s understanding that what you do can have an effect on the community for a long time. Careful examination is therefore essential. Any elected office does not belong to a single person, group or political party, it belongs to the citizens. I hope the people of Monroe continue to have confidence in what I have done so far and vote for me again; as I strive to have a reasonable and sane vision for the future of our city.

The usual, water, sewage and traffic. Are what we are faced with now. However, opioid addiction has had a big impact on our community and our nation. We must all be united against this scourge, because it affects us all.

Dorey Houle

I am currently an administrator in the village of Monroe, having served as a liaison with the police department and the town hall. I teach sign language programs for babies and toddlers at Monroe’s free library. My five children have all attended MW schools. We are a military family. My husband is a retired Air Force Reserves Master Sergeant and our oldest son is a US Army Specialist serving in South Korea.

I am running for City Council because, although the population of Monroe Village is equal to that of Monroe Town, there is no representation of the village on City Council. I look forward to representing the village and protecting its resources as a member of the city council.

One of the questions I look forward to discussing is how to alleviate the increasing traffic in the village of Monroe. With our proximity and easy travel to New York, Monroe has become a popular destination for former New York residents. Our roads were not designed to adapt to the increase in traffic. I look forward to developing traffic models that will reduce congestion in the village and town of Monroe.

Other races

City Supervisor Tony Cardone, a Republican, and City Judge Audra L. Schwartz, a Democrat, are also in the poll on Tuesday. Neither faces opposition.


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