Town council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:49:04 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Town council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ 32 32 Pacific Beach City Council Advocates Protecting Views of Kendall-Frost Mission Bay Marsh Preserve https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/pacific-beach-city-council-advocates-protecting-views-of-kendall-frost-mission-bay-marsh-preserve/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:49:04 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/pacific-beach-city-council-advocates-protecting-views-of-kendall-frost-mission-bay-marsh-preserve/ The Pacific Beach City Council became involved in the city’s plan to replace fencing around the Kendall-Frost Mission Bay Marsh Preserve out of a desire to save views. Council Secretary Susan Crowers described the city council’s efforts to thwart a City of San Diego proposal to erect a 6-foot chain-link fence with barbed wire atop […]]]>

The Pacific Beach City Council became involved in the city’s plan to replace fencing around the Kendall-Frost Mission Bay Marsh Preserve out of a desire to save views.

Council Secretary Susan Crowers described the city council’s efforts to thwart a City of San Diego proposal to erect a 6-foot chain-link fence with barbed wire atop Crown Point Drive, from Fortuna Avenue at Lamont Street. She said it would spoil the view of the nature sanctuary.

The project was brought to council’s attention by a resident who received notice of a Nov. 15 California Coastal Commission hearing to review the city’s permit application. The resident notified council two weeks before the hearing.

“If you look at the city’s website, it says to work with the community and stakeholders,” Crowers said. “The problem is that it seemed like no one knew. We’re stakeholders. We’re community members… so it was disappointing and I felt like, oh no, that’s too late.

Although the current fence is identical to the proposed replacement, the existing fence is located at the bottom of the slope. That means it doesn’t obstruct views from Crown Point Drive, including two observation decks and interpretive signs for the marsh.

According to Crowers, she and other board members hastily arranged a meeting with city and Audubon Society officials as well as the UC San Diego reserves director to discuss alternatives.

“But really, a chain-link fence?” said Crowers. “Is this the best we can do for this beautiful swamp? We stuck to our guns and said he deserved better.

City officials said they would work with the Pacific Beach community.

The commission staff report recommended a maximum 4-foot fence to protect the area while preserving views, Crowers said.

“I was really encouraged to see that this was included and that the Coast Commission really thought about (the proposal) and was quite thorough in their report and went back to the city and looked for a better solution,” said Crowers. “The city came back and said, yes, indeed, we will consider a more aesthetic design. So we’re very encouraged by that and hopefully plan to be part of that dialogue with them by coming up with a design that will really make that area look special.

Crowers concluded by addressing city officials at the meeting.

“I just want to point out a few things here,” she said. “The squeaky wheel thing works. And also just to tell our municipal reps that this is exactly the kind of stuff we want to hear about at general (council) meetings. When there are things going on, our community cares when we know what’s going on. We want to know and we want to be part of it.

Among other highlights of the meeting, council vice-chairman Karl Rand, who is also chairman of the PB planning board, said the permit to raze the community’s historic Chase Bank and its mosaics of l artist Millard Sheets had expired in August. No new demolition permit application has been submitted.

The original permit was issued in March 2020, sparking a highly visible campaign by the community to save the building’s prized artwork. The eight mosaics depict historical figures and scenes from San Diego.

“My sources at the city say they can’t tear it down without a permit and they haven’t even applied for a permit at this point,” Rand said. “So it’s in limbo. We’ll continue to watch that very carefully, but at the moment if you hear any rumors that it’s going to be demolished soon, it’s not true.

Located at 4650 Mission Bay Drive on the southwest corner of the intersection with Garnet Avenue, the architecturally significant Chase Bank building was built in 1977, making it a historic structure that could benefit of preservation status, Rand added.

“Because it’s just over 45, it would have to go through an additional examination of historic buildings, which would be another level,” he said. “The city cannot circumvent this process.”

The meeting was Marcella Bothwell’s last as chair. He completes two years in office.

“Thank you so much for giving me the past two years to serve the Pacific Beach community,” Bothwell told those in attendance. “I’m not going anywhere. I’m going to stay. I’ll be on the board and doing Concerts on the Green.

Bothwell is a retired surgeon who has lived in Pacific Beach for 15 years. She told PB Monthly that one of the biggest challenges she faced was leading the board during the COVID pandemic, which began almost simultaneously with her tenure. However, his previous career provided him with some of the dexterity needed to get by.

“It was actually a good time for me to step in because sorting out and figuring things out under uncertainty is something I’ve always been good at,” she said.

During her two years as chair, monthly board meetings have expanded to include regular reports from various community non-profit organizations such as Shoreline Community Services, the PB Street Guardians, beautifulPB and PB Planning Group. Its aim was to create a one-stop-shop at city council meetings to get an overview of the issues and activities going on in the PB. Bothwell said she considers its implementation her greatest achievement.

“It wasn’t by accident,” she said. “I did it on purpose to try to centralize information and it resulted in the community calendar. … I’m trying to get everyone to start working together instead of having these silos. We all have these different groups and none of them are working together. Why not?”

Bothwell said she needed to use a variety of techniques to get all interested parties behind her vision.

“My philosophy has been that if you can talk about something and everyone speaks up, then usually the right direction jumps,” Bothwell said. “But having the patience to wait for it to happen can be difficult. People’s attention span is very short. Sometimes you have to have the patience to wait for the right answer and the persistence to keep waiting even while people are yelling at you.

Bothwell said she believed the advent of a new generation of leaders with the ascension of student Charlie Nieto to the presidency in January, along with two equally young board members, would leave her greatest inheritance as precedent.

“I’m very excited about all the new blood we’ve brought in over the past year,” Bothwell said. “And it was time. I think they will have some good ideas. Their enthusiasm is immense. They will make mistakes. People are going to get upset about something or something or they’re going to disagree with it, but it’s time the organization was in capable young hands. I can’t wait to see how it will turn out. »

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Costessey Town Council set to debate plans for Dereham Road https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/costessey-town-council-set-to-debate-plans-for-dereham-road/ Sun, 20 Nov 2022 10:48:52 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/costessey-town-council-set-to-debate-plans-for-dereham-road/ An extraordinary city council is being convened after concerns were raised over plans for a £6.2million overhaul of a major city route. A public consultation is underway regarding Norfolk County Council and Transport for Norwich’s plans to improve Dereham Road with the aim of speeding up public transport and improving the route for cyclists and […]]]>

An extraordinary city council is being convened after concerns were raised over plans for a £6.2million overhaul of a major city route.

A public consultation is underway regarding Norfolk County Council and Transport for Norwich’s plans to improve Dereham Road with the aim of speeding up public transport and improving the route for cyclists and walkers.

Features include the creation of a travel hub at Bowthorpe Roundabout, as well as the removal of the nearby Butterfly Way pedestrian underpass.

New sections of incoming and outgoing bus lanes could also be constructed to accommodate shorter and more regular bus journeys.

Eastern Daily Press:

Dan Burrill, chairman of Costessey City Council, said: “People are very attached to it. I also hear comments asking why the bus service is bad.

“As City Council, we have decided that this is a matter of sufficient importance to hold a special meeting, open to the public, at 6 p.m. on November 21 at the Costessey Center.”

Mike Sands, Labor county and Bowthorpe town councilor, said: “Talking to voters, no one thinks the plans are a good idea.

“The only part that makes sense is to put in a cycle lane from Mayfly Way to the town, but the rest will create traffic jams.

“There is a shortage of buses. The main complaints I hear are people waiting 30 to 45 minutes to get one.”

Eastern Daily Press:

Garry Nicholass, Commercial Director of First East of England, said: ‘Dereham Road is one of Norwich’s most important public transport corridors and the scheme aims to improve bus journey times to make bus travel attractive. , reduce traffic jams, improve air quality and allow more frequent services on the red line 23 and 24.

“We apologize that over the past few months Norwich buses have not always been as reliable as we would like due to a shortage of drivers which has affected the whole industry and we have plans to fix it.”

Eastern Daily Press:

Conservative County Councilor Martin Wilby, Cabinet Member for Highways, Infrastructure and Transport and Chairman of the Transport Advisory Committee for Norwich, said: ‘These proposals set out a blueprint for improving sustainable travel across a significant part of our road network and support our plans to fight climate change through investments in public transport. The feedback is invaluable.”

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Cochrane City Council is asking the administration to overhaul the 2023-25 ​​budget with a lower property tax increase. https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/cochrane-city-council-is-asking-the-administration-to-overhaul-the-2023-25-budget-with-a-lower-property-tax-increase/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/cochrane-city-council-is-asking-the-administration-to-overhaul-the-2023-25-budget-with-a-lower-property-tax-increase/ As Cochrane City Council sat down to prepare to seriously discuss the city’s proposed 2023-2025 budget this week, Mayor Jeff Genung kicked things off with a seasonal reference. As Cochrane City Council sat down to prepare to seriously discuss the city’s proposed 2023-2025 budget this week, Mayor Jeff Genung kicked things off with a seasonal […]]]>

As Cochrane City Council sat down to prepare to seriously discuss the city’s proposed 2023-2025 budget this week, Mayor Jeff Genung kicked things off with a seasonal reference.

As Cochrane City Council sat down to prepare to seriously discuss the city’s proposed 2023-2025 budget this week, Mayor Jeff Genung kicked things off with a seasonal reference.

“It’s the most wonderful time of the year,” Genung said, making it clear afterward that he was only half-joking.

Nine hours, forty-three minutes and two days later, the council had asked the administration to go back to the drawing board and come up with options to cut the proposed property tax increase in half.

By the end of the second day, Genung probably wasn’t joking anymore.

The actual deliberations — the meat and potatoes of cutting the budget for Alberta’s fastest-growing city — begin after the revised draft returns to council next week.

As things stand, based on the average price of a house, the project proposes a property tax increase of 7.55%, which would translate into an increase of $15.67 per month, excluding utilities – sewage, water and storm sewer. With utilities included, the increase would be $23.22.

This time last year, the general discussion in the board was about the goal of a “growth plus inflation” budget. No one imagined what would happen to inflation in 2022.

For budgetary purposes, the administration projects population growth of 3.25% each year. Currently, inflation (based on the most recent estimates available from the City of Calgary) stands at 6.7%. The administration has pointed out in recent meetings that the actual municipal rate, which was not available this year, is generally higher than Calgary’s.

Chief Executive Mike Derricott noted that the process that resulted in the 7.55% tax increase began with a “teenage” increase.

He underlined the difficulty of reducing a budget largely influenced by inflation, before adding that he considers the prudent use of taxpayers’ money a sacred mission.

“Cochrane is one of the smartest organizations in local government in terms of how effectively and efficiently it spends taxpayers’ money, and that’s statistically demonstrable,” he said.

One of the conundrums facing management and the board is the stark reality that growth doesn’t pay off. In other words, a 3.25% increase in population does not translate into 3.25% more income.

The task, therefore, is to find a way to balance rising cost pressures with service level expectations.

The first agenda for the special meetings on November 15 and 16 was to clarify what information councilors would need to prepare for the actual deliberative process. After six hours of page-by-page questions about the operating budget on Tuesday, Coun. Morgan Nagel spoke for the first time to explain why he had remained silent until then.

He said what was going through his head was like buying a new four-wheel-drive truck, walking around with the salesman, listening to the numbers add up and the financial reality set in.

“I would quietly think, ‘I can’t afford a $70,000 truck,’ but I would quietly listen,” he said.

He said there was a “big disconnect” between where it is and the 7.55% hike currently on offer.

“People go to the gas station and don’t know how they’re going to pay for a full $200. They go to the grocery store and fill their cart and what used to be $350 is now $500,” he said.

“I think it is important that we recognize that it is going to be difficult for us to react to this inflationary environment, and if we go ahead and raise taxes by 7.55%, it is as if we simply couldn’t bear the brunt of inflation. challenges.”

Nagel identified two basic approaches to arriving at a tax increase that he could live with: advisers could go through the draft line by line, cutting as they go, or they could ask the administration to go back to the drawing board and redo a budget with a level increase of 3.5 to 4%.

He said he was not equipped to choose where to cut and would rather see the administration come back to the council with a simplified document, including options.

The rest of the board agreed with Nagel.

Com. Marni Fedeyko, citing the example of some single parents who had to go to the food bank this year, said the current financial pressures needed to be acknowledged.

Unlike Nagel, the adviser. Tara McFadden took a decidedly more meticulous approach over the previous six hours – to the point where it almost became humorous. She asked the administration for the number of employees attached to each department as they appeared in the review page by page, taking notes each time.

She said the council should aim for a “no frills” budget that represented reality, which she said would cut the proposed tax increase in half.

She offered a few suggestions as a starting point: a hiring freeze and no cost-of-living adjustments (COLA) for the board or management. (The proposed budget suggests a 3.5 percent increase in COLA for all non-union employees).

Genung accepted the decision to ask the administration to go back and seek cuts, and come back with more options. He acknowledged how difficult this process would be, pointing out that if the snow isn’t plowed and the grass isn’t cut, the city council will hear about it.

The mayor concluded by calling on residents to get involved in the discussion.

“I hope locals will stand up and give us their thoughts on what the cuts might look like,” Genung said.

So residents who are unhappy with the snow that still hasn’t been cleared in front of their driveways may need to consider how much they’re willing to pay to improve this service.

Or maybe how much they would pay for a used four-wheel-drive truck.

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Crowded E’town Council Session Sees Multiple Projects Approved | Local News https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/crowded-etown-council-session-sees-multiple-projects-approved-local-news/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/crowded-etown-council-session-sees-multiple-projects-approved-local-news/ In a flurry on Monday, Elizabethtown City Council went through a full list of agenda items en route to approving spending of about $1.8 million. Some of that money is being spent between a handful of capital improvement projects, including the extension of a gas main to Pritchard Parkway to serve a new development in […]]]>

In a flurry on Monday, Elizabethtown City Council went through a full list of agenda items en route to approving spending of about $1.8 million.

Some of that money is being spent between a handful of capital improvement projects, including the extension of a gas main to Pritchard Parkway to serve a new development in the city’s industrial park and a change order to an already improved stormwater improvement project on Henry Street.

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Burrillville City Council Candidates: An Apples to Apples Comparison https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/burrillville-city-council-candidates-an-apples-to-apples-comparison/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 11:30:58 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/burrillville-city-council-candidates-an-apples-to-apples-comparison/ BURRILLVILLE — Five candidates are vying for four seats on the Burrillville City Council, and while they’ve already talked a lot about potential voters in various press releases, you might be wondering how they stack up side by side. NOW asked candidates to provide biographical information, as well as answers to several questions. Below are […]]]>

BURRILLVILLE — Five candidates are vying for four seats on the Burrillville City Council, and while they’ve already talked a lot about potential voters in various press releases, you might be wondering how they stack up side by side.

NOW asked candidates to provide biographical information, as well as answers to several questions. Below are their responses when provided, along with links to statements they have previously released, where available.

Last name: Dennis Anderson

Last name: Donald Fox

Last name: David Houle

Last name: Stephen Rawson

  • Occupation: semi-retired
  • Education: CCRI & RWC
  • Years of living in town: born in the country, spent 5 years in other regions before the age of 21

Last name: Stacey SlekisALMI, AIRC, ACS

If you could accomplish just one project in the next term, what would it be?

Fox: The design and construction of a new artificial turf field at Burrillville High School. This would allow greater access to a world-class field for football, boys’ and girls’ soccer, boys’ and girls’ lacrosse and field hockey, as well as access to our Burrillville Patriots Football and Cheer Program and Burrillville Youth Lacrosse. The new complex will have a generational effect on our city and will reshape the city’s overall recreational plan for decades to come.

Swell: Constant improvement of the infrastructure.

Rawson: My new project, Senior Housing, is my goal for the next term. Being an elderly person and talking to my contemporaries, I realized there was a need for additional senior housing. With the Council’s support, we organized a committee to study the issues and commissioned a company to do a market feasibility study. Our suspicions of need were correct and the study suggested providing an additional 42 units. We are seeking to locate the facility on city-owned land on property that fronts on Routes 100 and 98. With the assistance of state, federal and private funding sources, we estimate the impact on local taxpayers will be almost nil.

Slekis: Ensuring our city retains its rural character is at the top of my list. While economic growth is a key driver for any city, we must maintain a delicate balance and preserve our lands, our open spaces, and protect our beautiful lakes. I don’t want to see our city become a city.

anderson: Harrisville Mill Pond Dam Repairs and Renovations

Can you name one issue or outcome from the last term that you wish had been different? For the two potential newcomers: can you name an issue on which you would have voted differently from current board members?

Swell: I’m excited to join the majority party and while I will always vote, independently, in the best interest of the taxpayers, I haven’t found anything I’d vote differently from the last two councils.

Rawson: I can’t think of a question that I would have liked to have seen differently during this quarter.

Slekis: As much as I am a gun owner and supporter of the Second Amendment and our constitutional rights, I would have voted differently on the resolution declaring Burrillville a 2n/a sanctuary city amendment. This resolution does not represent the beliefs of all residents and gives many the wrong impression of our city. Ronald Armand moved to Burrillville late last year with a stockpile of more than 200 guns and told officers he paid $500,000 cash for his home on Tarkiln Road because she was in a “Second Amendment sanctuary city,” according to a police report, recounting “that’s why he and his family moved here and if he couldn’t shoot his property, he would consider moving somewhere like Connecticut where he would have more freedom regarding firearms”.

Fox: The hindsight is 20-20, but despite that, I am confident in the positions the city council has taken and the results of our votes.

Anderson: Although not really in our control, I did not appreciate the virtual zoom meetings and the inability to meet in person during part of the COVID pandemic.

What unique quality or skill set do you bring to the board that other candidates may not have?

Rawson: What I bring to the Board is the continuity of my many years of service, knowledge of state law mandates and municipal ordinances is unmatched.

Slekis: I had the honor of working for one of Rhode Island’s largest insurers for over 25 years, in business for over 100 years, which prides itself on providing superior customer service. I currently manage teams located in Kolkata, India, Bangalore, India, Canada and Rhode Island. Throughout my tenure, I have developed essential skills for managing a city, such as risk management, project management using agile methodologies, achieving results through values-based and leadership skills that encourage diversity, collaboration, respect, inclusion and transparency.

Anderson: I would say that my analytical skills and my commitment to always be very well prepared on any subject are my strength. I’ve also been blessed with a career that has allowed me to experience a wide range of industries and people around the world, giving me relevant experience for almost anything. shows up.

Fox: City council members bring a diverse but overlapping skill set. Although I am a local business owner, one of our other members is as well. Perhaps it is my nearly 30 years of experience in international trade that is one aspect of my business background that is different from other City Council members.

Swell: My background as a business owner, combined with 4 years on the Harrisville Fire District Board, gives me a unique perspective on how to bring efficiencies to city departments and help maintain tax stability. Inflation and rising operating costs will constantly push taxes up. I will always look for ways to broaden our tax base, while maintaining the quality of life we ​​enjoy in Burrillville.

What accomplishment (professionally, voluntarily or within the municipal administration) are you most proud of?

Slekis: When I was offered my current role in my department, we had individual teams that were very siled and working independently with minimal cross-communication. I restructured our business practices and workflows, brought teams together through various team building sessions and engaged them by soliciting their thoughts and opinions throughout the process. This has resulted in increased efficiency and a team that works together with the vision that we are all working together towards the same goal.

Anderson: I was the designer, designer and construction coordinator for the FM Global SimZone in Norwood Massachusetts in 2010 and 2011. It is a unique hands-on training center for commercial and industrial property risks and their solutions which won national risk innovation awards in 2012 and 2014. .

Fox: I am very proud that I have been able to not only keep my local business in Burrillville, but expand it to the point where we have built a new 14,000 square foot facility in Mapleville, employing 18 people, nearly half of whom are Burrillville. Starting out as a one-person operation in the basement of our home on Camp Dixie Road and bringing the business to where it is now has been a challenging, yet fun and rewarding task. I was blessed to have some amazing people with me for the ride and look forward to many years to come as a proud Burrillville business owner.

Swell: First and always my family. Second, I designed and developed Broncos Crossing. I am also proud of my time on the previous Charter Committee and District Fire Council. Together with the other members of my Board of Directors, we always consider the taxpayer and keep operational costs under control.

Rawson: There are two that stand out, the completion of the sports fields and the track at the college. Also, the installation of the Welcome to Burrillville sign and the area along Bronco Freeway 102 at the city border.

Printable, PDF and email version
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Prime Minister thanks Orange Walk City Council and all teams working in Belize City https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prime-minister-thanks-orange-walk-city-council-and-all-teams-working-in-belize-city/ Fri, 04 Nov 2022 19:02:38 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prime-minister-thanks-orange-walk-city-council-and-all-teams-working-in-belize-city/ Views : 269 Posted: Friday, November 4, 2022. 1:02 p.m. CST. By Zoila Palma González: Prime Minister John Briceno thanked the Mayor of Orange Walk and his team for being on the ground in Belize City and helping with the cleanup. “At yesterday’s press conference, I pledged my administration’s full attention and support […]]]>



Views :
269

Posted: Friday, November 4, 2022. 1:02 p.m. CST.

By Zoila Palma González: Prime Minister John Briceno thanked the Mayor of Orange Walk and his team for being on the ground in Belize City and helping with the cleanup.

“At yesterday’s press conference, I pledged my administration’s full attention and support for the recovery of Belize City, the District of Belize and surrounding areas from Hurricane Lisa. Mayor Ladrick Orange Walk’s Sheppard heard that commitment and took it seriously, and today he not only honored a similar promise, but sent it into action…a team of 25 Orange Walk Council staff and equipment has crossed the Haulover Bridge while driving to Belize City to report for work,” Prime Minister Briceno said.

PM Briceno thanked Mayor Sheppard and all the teams working together to recover from the impacts of Hurricane Lisa.

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Highlanders call on city council to set up a sustainability commission https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/highlanders-call-on-city-council-to-set-up-a-sustainability-commission/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/highlanders-call-on-city-council-to-set-up-a-sustainability-commission/ A group of Highlanders are trying to set up a sustainability commission. File, time HIGHLAND – When David and Sarah Masciotra moved to Highland 10 years ago, they were drawn to the city’s trails, the Heron Rookery and the walkable downtown. Now he and other Highland residents want to ensure the town’s natural resources are […]]]>





A group of Highlanders are trying to set up a sustainability commission.


File, time


HIGHLAND – When David and Sarah Masciotra moved to Highland 10 years ago, they were drawn to the city’s trails, the Heron Rookery and the walkable downtown.

Now he and other Highland residents want to ensure the town’s natural resources are protected for generations to come.

“There is often a misperception that there is a conflict between economic vitality and environmentalism,” Masciotra said at an Oct. 24 city council meeting. He and Sarah are “living proof that they often work in tandem because conservation, natural beauty and sustainability are very appealing to young people, young families and retirees looking to relocate.”

Masciotra was one of 12 people who spoke in favor of creating a city sustainability commission during the public consultation session. The Highland Neighbors for Sustainability group, formed in 2020, drafted a bill for the creation of the commission.

People also read…

“We hope council recognizes the value of a citizen-led sustainability commission to research and bring back suggested solutions on environmental topics,” said Connie Wachala.

The idea grew out of the recent greenhouse gas inventory conducted by Indiana University’s Environmental Resilience Cohort. In 2021, Earth Charter Indiana, NWI Region Resilience, and the Northwest Indiana Regional Planning Commission (NIRPC) banded together and joined the cohort.

The team was able to secure funding for six Climate Fellows to conduct greenhouse gas inventories for Lake, Porter, and LaPorte counties as well as Cedar Lake, Chesterton, East Chicago, Highland, Hobart, Lake Station, the city of LaPorte, Merrillville, Munster, Schererville and Valparaiso.

The project was later extended, so they were able to inventory Hammond and Portage as well.

Industry accounted for the bulk of the region’s overall emissions, but residential emissions made up the largest slice of the pie in Cedar Lake, Chesterton, Hobart, Lake Station, Schererville, and Highland.

In the second year of the Environmental Resilience Cohort, participants create a climate action plan. Because each community in the region is so unique, NIRPC, NWI Region Resilience, and Earth Charter are creating a climate action plan that offers a menu of options. Municipalities can select the most applicable options.

Because members of town and city councils often have outside jobs and are “so involved in the day-to-day chores of trying to run a city or town,” Wachala said, it could be difficult to implement. climate action plans without a dedicated commission.

The sustainability commission “can be a help if they (the city council) allow us to,” Wachala said.

The proposed commission ordinance is being reviewed by the city’s legal counsel. Wachala said the commission will likely have five representatives and hopefully include local students. The commission would research various sustainability initiatives and make suggestions to city council.

“There are a lot of people who care about the environment,” said Alex Bazán, “and I think a sustainability commission provides that extra capacity to help the staff of the town of Highland do more in terms of sustainability. examination of various environmental problems.”

Sustainability efforts look different in northwest Indiana, Wachala said, but communities can learn from each other.

Michigan City and the Town of LaPorte already have commissions, Gary has a department of sustainability and environmental affairs, and Valparaiso has a citizen-led sustainability group.

“If you all embrace this, it will put influence on those other communities that should see the value in it,” Hammond’s Linda Anguiano told the council at the Oct. 24 meeting. “If we all work together, we can have a really strong region.”

The sustainability commission legislation will be discussed at Highland City Council’s study session on November 21, starting at 6.30pm.

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Students chair Birch Hills Town Council meeting https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/students-chair-birch-hills-town-council-meeting/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 19:02:48 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/students-chair-birch-hills-town-council-meeting/ Michael Oleksyn/Daily Herald Birch Hills Mayor Stewart Adams (right) gives Birch Hills Public School Grade 5 students Cole Shore (left) and Elin Cochrane (center) a crash course in holding a meeting of the municipal council on Wednesday, October 19. A pair of pupils from Birch Hills Primary School got a taste of what it’s like […]]]>
Michael Oleksyn/Daily Herald Birch Hills Mayor Stewart Adams (right) gives Birch Hills Public School Grade 5 students Cole Shore (left) and Elin Cochrane (center) a crash course in holding a meeting of the municipal council on Wednesday, October 19.

A pair of pupils from Birch Hills Primary School got a taste of what it’s like to do business at City Council on Wednesday, October 19.

Birch Hills Public School Grade 5 President Elin Cochrane and Vice President Cole Shore presided over the first 20 minutes of Birch Hills City Council at the Birch Hills Civic Center.

The opportunity arose after 5th grade teacher Josh Donauer reached out to Mayor Stewart Adams to see if he would come talk to the class about what it’s like to be mayor. Adams accepted the invitation and visited the class last month.

“I think it’s really important for young people to be exposed to councils and democracy and how it works,” Adams said.

“(Councillor) Graham (Twetan) and I went to class and sat down and Josh was kind enough to ask the kids to ask questions and he sent them to me ahead of time,” he wrote. he adds. “Then Graham and I answered that and answered any other questions they had.”

The list of questions included tough points like whether Birch Hills elected officials regret running for public office or how much money they make in their roles as mayor and councillor. However, there were also civic-minded questions like “what are some of the responsibilities of the mayor and councillors”, as well as personal questions like what made them want to run for public office in the first place.

A student asked if there was a limo in town.

“Does the mayor show up for work every day in a limo? I’m lucky if I get here in half a ton,” said Adams, who served on council from 2007 to 2012 before leaving politics for a decade and returning as mayor in 2022.

According to Donauer, the most pressing question was which house Adams lived in.

“I have a big rock in front of my house,” Adams told the class.

At the end of the meeting, Adams and Twetan invited the class election winners to visit the Birch Hills council.

The election took place about a month ago when Twetan and Adam visited the class.

Adams gave Cochrane and Shore a quick crash course in chairing a city council meeting before the duo took over. The students were responsible for calling the meeting to order with a Multicultural Day statement and correspondence. Cochrane chaired the start of the meeting before Shore took over for the final part.

Shore said he was excited to chair the meeting and Cochrane said she was nervous.

“That you don’t drink weird stuff to become mayor,” Cochrane said when asked what she learned from the visit.

It may sound strange, but class elections at Birch Hills Public School can get quite competitive.

Cochrane is entering her second term as president after winning in a split 4th and 5th grade class last year. Donauer said the class takes the election very seriously, with candidates promising their classmates they’ll do things like eat a worm if they win.

In Cochrane’s case, she had promised to bring her cat to school, but the year before she had drunk hot milk, a box of hot juice and finished with hot yoghurt.

Shore countered by promising to take the class to the wave pool, a wish he has yet to fulfill.

“I can’t do it because she’s president and I’m vice,” Shore said.

Cochrane said she couldn’t be pressured into making it happen.

Cochrane was able to do two terms because last year there were split afternoon classes. Donauer’s class is the only one in the school that has an election. He said the goal is to help students understand how governments are chosen and hopefully this will lead to students taking on leadership roles as they enter high school and college.

michael.oleksyn@paherald.sk.ca

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Steve Alfred runs for Hilton Head SC City Council Ward 5 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/steve-alfred-runs-for-hilton-head-sc-city-council-ward-5/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:28:13 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/steve-alfred-runs-for-hilton-head-sc-city-council-ward-5/ Photo provided Hilton Head Island, South Carolina The candidate with the most experience in the Hilton Head municipal elections is Steve Alfred, 88, who is seeking to extend his years of municipal service in Ohio as a representative of the Hilton Head City Council from Ward 5. Before moving to Hilton Head Island, the retired […]]]>

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The candidate with the most experience in the Hilton Head municipal elections is Steve Alfred, 88, who is seeking to extend his years of municipal service in Ohio as a representative of the Hilton Head City Council from Ward 5.

Before moving to Hilton Head Island, the retired attorney spent 16 years serving in Shaker Heights, Ohio — eight years as the city’s mayor and eight years on the city council.

Currently, Alfred is a member of the Hilton Head Planning Commission. Beyond local government, Alfred previously worked as a campaign finance and ethics advocate at the Georgia State House.

Alfred is a graduate of Princeton University and Harvard Law School.

The Island Packet sent questionnaires to contestants in contested races and limited them to 150 words per response.

Here are Alfred’s answers:

What campaign issue is most pressing for you? Why do you think this issue should be the top priority?

As a resident of Sea Pines, the long-standing traffic issue at Sea Pines Circle is a top priority. This impacts not only those entering and exiting Sea Pines, but also shopkeepers on Pope Avenue and Coligny Circle as well as bathers.

After that, I’m mostly concerned with the development of affordable and workforce housing, considering ways to moderate the growth of development and traffic, ensuring that short-term housing regulations are efficient, outpacing climate change by improving our stormwater drainage system to reduce coastal areas. floods and support arts and cultural affairs at all levels.

What is your position on the recently approved US 278 plan?

I am delighted with the MOU [Memorandum of Understanding] was approved so that the project could finally move forward. Two bridge spans would have cost an additional $25-30 million, taken several additional years to complete, and raised additional environmental issues – it just wasn’t practical. The agreement provides for an end-to-end traffic study, as requested by a group of citizens, which will take a number of additional months.

Synchronization of traffic lights along the length of 278 is highly desirable and progressing. Although the county is legally responsible for the project, the city must still provide its “municipal consent”, which it will be required to do after the traffic study for the project to proceed.

The decision rests with the current city council. Not only has the county (and some council members) pushed for a quick decision, but the current council is one that has been working closely with issues and negotiations for several years.

What steps would you take to address the labor housing shortage? Is the solution a public or private sector problem? Should Hilton Head focus on encouraging off-island housing through the regional housing trust fund or build locally?

The city, as it does, should make city-owned land available for this purpose, retain a private sector entity to guide it through this process, and make the land available at a discount to give developers an incentive. economical to build such housing. After gaining some knowledge of the postal sector on the north side, the city should move forward with other such developments, both large and small. The city should also consider improving transportation facilities for off-island workers.

While it would be nice if the private sector could build such accommodations, as the Sea Pines Resort has done, smaller entities do not have the capital or the means to participate. Indeed, the city changed its zoning ordinances to allow for greater density of workforce housing as an incentive, but no response was received. So while there will be some private sector involvement, much of the development will have to be city led.

Again, while local construction should be the primary focus, the city should also participate in the Regional Housing Trust Fund to encourage off-island development as well, as some HHI workers may prefer to live off-island. of the island.

The Chamber of Commerce receives significant public funding each year, but is not subject to the same transparency laws as the city council. What steps, if any, would you take to ensure greater chamber transparency on the use of public funds?

The city and the public need to know how the chamber spends its public ATAX funds received from the state through the [Accommodations Tax], and it is largely done. (The chamber also receives private funding from the hospitality industry.) The council, as the policy maker, should provide general direction to the chamber regarding the city’s goals. For example, the city needs to know the demographics of the target audience for magazine ads, as well as whether the advertised amenities (golf, beach, hotels, restaurants) are the only ones to focus on and why.

The friction between developing and maintaining the character of Hilton Head has recently come to light. How do you think the city should balance the two? Is it more important today to develop for the future or to preserve the past?

The city needs to do both affordable housing and the 278 project. Funding for the 278 corridor project has essentially been secured. Funding for the workforce housing projects from government agencies as well as private sources has yet to be secured, on which the outside consultant will likely be helpful. One of the city’s main financial contributions will be the rebate it offers on the sale or lease of city-owned land to a development agency.

While historic preservation, like the one underway in Mitchelville, is important, we need to focus strongly on issues that affect our future, like our drainage system to mitigate flooding and rising tides.

Blake is the Hilton Head Island reporter for Island Packet. Originally from Tulsa, Oklahoma, Blake has written for his hometown Tulsa World, as well as the Charlotte Observer. He graduated in May 2022 from the University of Oklahoma with a degree in journalism.

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Clerk Pe Ell gives notice of resignation at town council meeting; Council approves June 16 vacation https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/clerk-pe-ell-gives-notice-of-resignation-at-town-council-meeting-council-approves-june-16-vacation/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:45:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/clerk-pe-ell-gives-notice-of-resignation-at-town-council-meeting-council-approves-june-16-vacation/ By Matthew Zylstra / matthew@chronline.com At the Pe Ell town council meeting on Tuesday, town clerk Terra Oster advised council that she would be stepping down as of December 31. The announcement followed comments earlier in the meeting from councilor Michael Nichols, who expressed concern about what he saw as discrepancies between council actions and […]]]>

By Matthew Zylstra / matthew@chronline.com

At the Pe Ell town council meeting on Tuesday, town clerk Terra Oster advised council that she would be stepping down as of December 31. The announcement followed comments earlier in the meeting from councilor Michael Nichols, who expressed concern about what he saw as discrepancies between council actions and the written minutes of a meeting.

Oster expressed frustration over what she saw as allegations that she was falsifying documents as well as what she saw as rude behavior at the previous council meeting on October 4, when members of the public spoke against the grain of a proposed VR development project.

“You’re all ugly to each other,” Oster said. “Being kind is what this town is all about.”

Oster also told the board that minutes are not official until approved by the board and that she has made changes to unofficial minutes in the past to correct errors at advisors request. She further said that other board members used email to send her changes to the minutes before they were approved at subsequent board meetings, adding that she asked Nichols to get a email account before so he can do the same.

After Oster’s announcement, Mayor Lonnie Willey told Nichols that he should have come to see the mayor privately, rather than raise the issue in council.

Other council members came to Oster’s defense.

“It was a simple typo,” Councilwoman Jilona Speer said of Nichols’ complaint.

“Terra is the best person in this role I’ve ever seen (in my time on the board),” Councilwoman Kristi Milanowski said. “We are so lucky to have him.”

Oster is one of two city employees who has a Level One Water Permit. According to state rules, two employees are required to have a water license in order to operate a water plant. According to Willey, after Oster quit Pe Ell’s job, the city could not be in compliance when operating its water plant unless it could hire someone else with it. a license.

During the meeting, the council also voted to add Juneteenth to the city’s holiday calendar. The council voted four to one to add the holiday to the calendar. Councilman Chris Dodd was the only no.

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