Town council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 06:39:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Town council – Gary Singh For City Council http://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/ 32 32 Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission Member Announces Candidacy for City Council Seat https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/flower-mound-planning-and-zoning-commission-member-announces-candidacy-for-city-council-seat/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 23:31:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/flower-mound-planning-and-zoning-commission-member-announces-candidacy-for-city-council-seat/ Robbie Cox has announced he will run for Flower Mound City Council in May. (Courtesy of Robbie Cox) Robbie Cox, a member of the Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission, has announced that he will run for the Flower Mound 3 City Council place next year. “I’m running for Flower Mound,” he said. “It means […]]]>

Robbie Cox has announced he will run for Flower Mound City Council in May. (Courtesy of Robbie Cox)

Robbie Cox, a member of the Flower Mound Planning and Zoning Commission, has announced that he will run for the Flower Mound 3 City Council place next year.

“I’m running for Flower Mound,” he said. “It means I’m running to be cooperative, collaborative and positive to find the best solutions for the whole city. “

The seat of the board is occupied by Ben Bumgarner, whose term expires in May. Bumgarner announced in November that he was running for the District 63 seat of the state House of Representatives. The next municipal elections will take place on May 7. The official nomination period for this election will begin on January 19.

Cox has served as Vice Chairman of the Board since 2018. Professionally, he is Senior Vice President of Business Development at Dagley Insurance.

If elected to the board, Cox said he plans to focus on growing Flower Mound.

“I just saw the whole region change a lot over the years,” he said.

He said he would like to apply his experience on the commission to his potential time on city council.

“We have to be very careful what we do with the land we have,” he said. “We have to think about it financially and what’s good for the whole city.”

Cox said the board needs to carefully consider Flower Mound’s development over the next several years, as remaining space is limited. Two areas of concern for Cox are the Cross Timbers Conservation District and the Lakeside Business District, he said.

He said the board had to be intentional when considering the “end stages” of Flower Mound’s development.

Cox and his family moved to Flower Mound in 2005. He said he hopes to represent all voices in town.

“I have an ear to listen to residents across Flower Mound, not just residents of my backyard,” he said.


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The Town Hall of Huércal-Overa is launching a new edition of the Study Habits and Techniques Workshop https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-town-hall-of-huercal-overa-is-launching-a-new-edition-of-the-study-habits-and-techniques-workshop/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 15:30:16 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/the-town-hall-of-huercal-overa-is-launching-a-new-edition-of-the-study-habits-and-techniques-workshop/ Huércal-Overa Study Habits and Techniques Workshop. Credit: Ayto Huércal-Overa The Town Hall of Huércal-Overa is launching a new edition of the Study Habits and Techniques Workshop. The City Council of Huércal-Overa, through the Department of Social Assistance, has launched a new edition of the training workshop “Studying habits and techniques”, which is being held this […]]]>
Huércal-Overa Study Habits and Techniques Workshop. Credit: Ayto Huércal-Overa

The Town Hall of Huércal-Overa is launching a new edition of the Study Habits and Techniques Workshop.

The City Council of Huércal-Overa, through the Department of Social Assistance, has launched a new edition of the training workshop “Studying habits and techniques”, which is being held this year at the Mónica Sánchez Social Service Center.

The workshop is part of the “Cities Against Drug Addiction” prevention program which includes a variety of different activities.

The social assistance adviser, María José Viudez, who was accompanied by students at the start of the workshop, underlined that “thanks to this initiative, we will provide children and adolescents with educational tools and greater autonomy in their learning ”.

“The tools they learn will be of great use to them as they face their college years, improving their performance and preparing them for the future,” she said.

The workshop is aimed at elementary school students in the 4th and 5th years.

Grade 4 students have already started the workshop and will complete a total of 5 sessions of approximately 1.5 hours, once a week. The topics to be covered consist of study habits and study techniques.

The 5th grade students will then begin their sessions on January 13, 20 and 27.

The activity is free and registration is open on the town hall website www.huercal-overa.es.


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Candidate for mayor of Pampanga, driver killed in an ambush https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/candidate-for-mayor-of-pampanga-driver-killed-in-an-ambush/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 08:50:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/candidate-for-mayor-of-pampanga-driver-killed-in-an-ambush/ CITY OF SAN FERNANDO – A candidate for the post of municipal councilor of the city of San Simon in Pampanga and his driver were killed on Saturday morning in an ambush by unknown gunmen, Vice-Mayor Leonora Wong confirmed during a telephone interview. Wong, who is now acting mayor in place of suspended mayor Abundio […]]]>

CITY OF SAN FERNANDO – A candidate for the post of municipal councilor of the city of San Simon in Pampanga and his driver were killed on Saturday morning in an ambush by unknown gunmen, Vice-Mayor Leonora Wong confirmed during a telephone interview.

Wong, who is now acting mayor in place of suspended mayor Abundio Punsalan Jr., identified the victim as Rogelio “Jonjon” Salvador, 42, who runs for the leadership of the provincial Kambilan party.

Pampanga police chief Col. Robin Sarmiento confirmed Rogelio’s nephew Joel Salvador also died in the attack at 7:30 a.m. Joel was Roegelio’s driver, police said.

Arnel Caparas who was also in the car was injured in the attack. He is now in critical condition in a hospital.

Wong said the gun attack occurred as the victims’ car approached the San Miguel Bridge towards Barangay Concepcion, where Salvador was the former village chief.

The armed men were also in a car coming from the opposite direction.

“They were about to join our motorcade to promote National Immunization Days when they were ambushed,” Wong told the Inquirer. Sarmiento has not yet confirmed whether the gun attack was linked to the elections.

/ MUF

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Prescott Valley City Council Approves Licensing Agreement with Sunwest HC, Inc. for Youth Sports Complex https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prescott-valley-city-council-approves-licensing-agreement-with-sunwest-hc-inc-for-youth-sports-complex/ Fri, 26 Nov 2021 21:16:29 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/prescott-valley-city-council-approves-licensing-agreement-with-sunwest-hc-inc-for-youth-sports-complex/ Presented by Beltone – A leader in audience health care. On September 23, 2021, Prescott Valley City Council authorized the purchase of the Yavapai County Exhibition Center in the former Yavapai County Exhibition Center complex. The ultimate intention of the purchase was to license the building and additional land (a total of 37 acres) to […]]]>
Presented by Beltone – A leader in audience health care.

On September 23, 2021, Prescott Valley City Council authorized the purchase of the Yavapai County Exhibition Center in the former Yavapai County Exhibition Center complex. The ultimate intention of the purchase was to license the building and additional land (a total of 37 acres) to a third party for the creation of a youth sports complex. The purchase transaction with the county is expected to close on Monday, November 22, when the city officially takes ownership.

Prescott Valley City Council Approves License Agreement with Sunwest HC, Inc. for Az Youth Sports Complex Signals

On Thursday, November 18, at its regular meeting, Council approved a license agreement with Sunwest HC, Inc. to create and operate the complex.

Under the terms of the agreement, Sunwest HC, Inc. will be responsible for all building maintenance, renovations and utilities. Any permanent modification made to the building will become the property of the City at the end of the agreement. Sunwest HC, Inc. will pay rent of $ 100,000 the first year, $ 125,000 the second year and $ 150,000 the third year. The rent for the four and five years will be based on a standard consumer price index (CPI) adjustment using the third year as the base.

Sunwest HC and the City of Prescott Valley will share all of the naming rights revenues from the building, as well as a supplement on tournaments, which is also expected to generate indirect revenues and other economic benefits for the city, as players and their families stay in local hotels and eat at local restaurants.

As part of its operation during the tenure, Sunwest HC, as the Wheelhouse Sports Complex, has indicated its intention to install two portable rinks and two volleyball courts inside the building as well as other renovations and repairs. It also provides for a BMX track in an open area to the south of the building. Wheelhouse board chairman Charlie Arnold said Wheelhouse is planning three possible roller hockey tournaments in 2022, with a projection of 500 players per tournament, and forecasting jobs for 20 people.

The duration of the license agreement is five years with potential extensions of two years. For updates, visit Wheelhouse AZ on Facebook.


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Monrovia City Council discusses county efforts to dissolve buffer zones https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/monrovia-city-council-discusses-county-efforts-to-dissolve-buffer-zones/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 18:58:44 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/monrovia-city-council-discusses-county-efforts-to-dissolve-buffer-zones/ MONROVIA – The concept of buffer zones was a topic of discussion within the Monrovia City Council at its recent meeting, with most members voicing concerns about the county’s efforts to dissolve all of Morgan County’s buffer zones. Buffer zones are areas outside the boundaries of municipalities like Martinsville, Mooresville, and Monrovia that give towns […]]]>

MONROVIA – The concept of buffer zones was a topic of discussion within the Monrovia City Council at its recent meeting, with most members voicing concerns about the county’s efforts to dissolve all of Morgan County’s buffer zones.

Buffer zones are areas outside the boundaries of municipalities like Martinsville, Mooresville, and Monrovia that give towns and villages planning and zoning jurisdiction, but residents of those areas cannot vote for them. elected municipal officials.

Others read: Martinsville planners recommend a zoning change for agricultural properties; developer planning 280 housing units.

The Morgan County Planning Commission discussed the dissolution of the buffer zones at its November 8 meeting.

“We absolutely don’t want that to happen,” City Councilor Kevin Collier said Tuesday evening.

“One problem for cities and such is that (the county planning commission) will be able to make a decision on something that goes against our wishes,” said Councilor Loren Moore.

“On the other hand, the people who live in the buffer zone (…) have no recourse to go ahead and vote for the city officials,” said the chairman of the Monrovia city council. , Philip Fowler. “It’s a double-edged sword.”

“If they are trying to dissolve the buffer zones, we have to make the effort to propose incorporation, if they are cooperative,” added City Councilor Bonnie Silsby-Inman. “It gives more protection.”


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City council calls for childcare deal https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-calls-for-childcare-deal/ Mon, 22 Nov 2021 15:53:32 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-calls-for-childcare-deal/ Councilors call on the province and the federal government to reach an agreement to provide accessible, quality and affordable child care in Oakville and other communities in Ontario. While the federal government has struck a deal with most other provinces to institute a national child care program promised at $ 10 a day, Ontario has […]]]>

Councilors call on the province and the federal government to reach an agreement to provide accessible, quality and affordable child care in Oakville and other communities in Ontario.

While the federal government has struck a deal with most other provinces to institute a national child care program promised at $ 10 a day, Ontario has resisted the offer, arguing it is a bad idea. agreement for taxpayers.

Oakville councilors unanimously approved a motion urging both parties to “achieve a fair child care agreement that recognizes the provincial investment in full-time kindergarten and provides affordable child care spaces. and accessible for Ontario families ”.

According to the motion presented by Ward 7 Councilor Pavan Parmer, the Liberal plan would save Oakville parents up to $ 14,843 per year by 2026.

Parmar said the pandemic has highlighted the importance of child care in keeping women in the workforce, adding that many families spend a substantial portion of their paychecks on child care costs.

Her concerns were echoed by Ward 3 Councilor Janet Haslett-Theall.

“During my career as a human resources professional, I have witnessed the incredible financial and emotional stress that families go through to obtain quality affordable child care,” she said.

“Having an affordable, quality child care infrastructure enables families to make healthy personal choices and is essential to our economy. “


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City Council unanimously votes to adopt Leland 2045, a guide for future development and growth https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-unanimously-votes-to-adopt-leland-2045-a-guide-for-future-development-and-growth/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 23:15:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/city-council-unanimously-votes-to-adopt-leland-2045-a-guide-for-future-development-and-growth/ Leland 2045 guides the vision and goals for the city’s growth as its population is expected to reach 75,000 in 25 years. (Courtesy Leland 2045) LELAND – At a city council meeting on Thursday evening, members adopted the Leland 2045 plan to help guide how the fastest growing town in Brunswick County will approach its […]]]>
Leland 2045 guides the vision and goals for the city’s growth as its population is expected to reach 75,000 in 25 years. (Courtesy Leland 2045)

LELAND – At a city council meeting on Thursday evening, members adopted the Leland 2045 plan to help guide how the fastest growing town in Brunswick County will approach its inevitable expansion over the next 25 years .

Leland has doubled its population from 13,527 in 2010 to 23,504, according to the 2020 US census. Projections have estimated that the city could grow by more than 70,000 people over the next two decades.

RELATED: Upscale Mixed-Use Offices Head to Waterford in 2022

“Adopting Leland 2045 is an important step as it sets the framework for how Leland should develop and conserve land as we balance population growth and demographic change,” said Ben Andrea, director of the planning and inspections, in a press release.

The plan, the largest ever developed by the city, was designed with the help of the consultancy firm Design Workshop. Yet gradually until its finalization, Leland 2045 garnered community feedback through numerous surveys, workshops, focus groups, and public engagement opportunities over the past year.

Responses to the survey place affordable housing, coastal resilience and traffic congestion among the top areas of interest for current residents.

The goal of Leland 2045 is to balance the needs of its people with healthy development that preserves the natural environments in the 20-mile city – along US-74 and 87, to Town Creek and to the east to Brunswick River, Cape Fear River and Eagles Island. The document that city staff will refer to in the coming years promotes “green building and development techniques as part of Leland’s image, character and brand” and seeks to protect and maintain ” water quality in all coastal wetlands, rivers, streams and estuaries.

Yet it also highlights the housing and transportation needs. Social interaction, community recreation and physical connectivity remain points of interest, as Leland 2045 addresses planning for open spaces. It is committed to developing with economically diverse neighborhoods, built with pedestrian and bicycle connections to nearby parks and commercial areas, including shops and restaurants. This will help “reduce sprawl and self-reliant development”, according to the plan, which also includes improvements in traffic management and “traffic calming techniques”.

Leland 2045 strives to diversify the city’s economy, nurturing impacts in industry, business and employment development. Areas of focus include strengthening the efforts of the Leland Innovation Park, focusing on agricultural industries driven by local manufacturing operations, adding workforce training to education, and capitalizing on its reputation in the retirement community, as well as in the travel and tourism industry.

Public health and safety, support for the arts, expanding city-wide transit use, and incentives for grocery shopping in underserved areas are also discussed.

“While the plan provides policy direction on land use, the key is how the built and preserved environment can benefit the people of Leland by creating places where residents’ daily needs are met, l ‘Social interaction and recreation can take place, and the sense of community is enhanced,’ Andrea said in the release.

City council voted unanimously Monday to pass Leland 2045; it can be read in full here. A press release says city staff will provide quarterly updates on how it is being implemented with planning.


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Chapel Hill City Council approves more than $ 660,000 to fund affordable housing projects https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/chapel-hill-city-council-approves-more-than-660000-to-fund-affordable-housing-projects/ Fri, 19 Nov 2021 06:29:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/chapel-hill-city-council-approves-more-than-660000-to-fund-affordable-housing-projects/ Chapel Hill City Council unanimously voted to approve more than $ 660,000 in funding for affordable housing development at its meeting on Wednesday. Affordable housing organizations CASA, Community Home Trust, EmPOWERment, Inc. and Habitat for Humanity have applied for funding for several projects in Chapel Hill. CASA requested $ 300,000 for the Homestead Gardens project, […]]]>

Chapel Hill City Council unanimously voted to approve more than $ 660,000 in funding for affordable housing development at its meeting on Wednesday.

Affordable housing organizations CASA, Community Home Trust, EmPOWERment, Inc. and Habitat for Humanity have applied for funding for several projects in Chapel Hill.

CASA requested $ 300,000 for the Homestead Gardens project, which would house 117 affordable housing units, including 32 rental units. The project aims to serve extremely low to moderate income populations. The location, 2200 Homestead Road, is close to public transportation for residents to use.

Sarah Viñas, director of affordable housing and community connections for the town of Chapel Hill, said the funding requested by CASA was needed to secure a $ 3 million grant for the project. The Housing Advisory Council recommended full funding for the project.

EmPOWERment, Inc. has also requested funding of approximately $ 248,000 for the acquisition of the Lindsay Street Duplex and for the relocation of Gomains House. The Lindsay Street duplex would offer two affordable rental units ready to move into. The move from Gomains House involves moving a house from North Street to land owned by EmPOWERment on Gomains Street.

The Housing Advisory Board decided to recommend fully funding the acquisition of the Lindsay Street duplex, but only partially funding the move to Gomains House.

Additionally, although the Community Home Trust requested $ 60,000 to purchase a house on Graham Street, the Housing Advisory Board did not recommend funding this project due to limited funding. The project was not included in the amended recommended financing plan.

Habitat for Humanity has requested $ 150,000 to purchase a property to build approximately eight homes and expects the project to take approximately eight years.

“This would constitute an opportunity to set aside land for their future development,” said Viñas.

Although the Housing Advisory Board did not recommend funding the Habitat for Humanity project, the board voted to approve funding for the project after $ 379,000 was made available through the Fund’s Opportunities Fund. for affordable housing.

Jennifer Player, CEO of Habitat for Humanity in Orange County, said the land in Chapel Hill is a “scarce and finite commodity” and urged council to fund the Habitat for Humanity project .

“There is an urgent affordable housing deficit in Chapel Hill – a deficit that will only grow over time without intentional leadership today,” Player said.

Mayor Pam Hemminger expressed her support for Habitat for Humanity’s request.

“The land will only get more expensive as we go along,” Hemminger said. “So setting aside land is really important. “

Mayor Pro Tem Michael Parker also expressed his support for the EMPOWERment, Inc. and Habitat for Humanity projects.

The unanimous vote approved the funding plan recommended by the Housing Advisory Board for the CASA and EmPOWERment, Inc. projects and added the Habitat for Humanity project.

The board also announced its recognition of Nov. 27 as Small Business on Saturday at the meeting.

The council welcomed Tamara Lackey to speak on behalf of the small business owners of Chapel Hill. Lackey is the owner of Coco Espresso, Bistro & Bar in Chapel Hill. Lackey thanked City Council for declaring the day a celebration for small businesses and encouraged everyone to “shop small” on this day.

“Buying local, of course, is so important because every time you make a purchase from a local business, you are supporting local jobs and helping to preserve the local character of our community,” said Lackey. “At the end of the day, when you spend it here, you keep it here. So let’s stay local.

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Charles City Council Votes To Maintain Order, Ends Video Lottery Offer For Inkwell’s | Newspaper https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/charles-city-council-votes-to-maintain-order-ends-video-lottery-offer-for-inkwells-newspaper/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/charles-city-council-votes-to-maintain-order-ends-video-lottery-offer-for-inkwells-newspaper/ CHARLES TOWN – After weeks of discussions and multiple motions to table the issue, Charles Town City Council voted 6-2 Monday night in favor of accepting the planning commission’s recommendation to leave like this is a city ordinance that does not allow video lottery machines in downtown Restaurants. The topic was first broached by Inkwell’s […]]]>

CHARLES TOWN – After weeks of discussions and multiple motions to table the issue, Charles Town City Council voted 6-2 Monday night in favor of accepting the planning commission’s recommendation to leave like this is a city ordinance that does not allow video lottery machines in downtown Restaurants.

The topic was first broached by Inkwell’s Tavern, whose owner was looking to add video lottery machines to the establishment in order to earn more revenue. There was some debate as to whether adding machines to the restaurant would be in line with the city’s overall plan. The city’s planning commission recently ruled that it did not believe the additions would be in line with the plan.

Previously, the board voted 4-4 on the issue, as well as 3-5 on a motion to postpone discussion indefinitely. Council members James Kratovil and Jean Petti voted against Monday night’s vote. Ahead of the vote, Kratovil pleaded to send the order back to the planning committee for further consideration on the possibility of allowing Inkwell’s to use video lottery machines and the business they might bring.

“I researched this and found two types of video lottery you can have in a bar,” Kratovil began. “One is that the whole bar has to be over 21, and you can have the video lottery machines in the open. The other is that you create a room for the video lottery. I think that’s consistent with the compensation plan, which says we want to foster new business and encourage and support existing businesses.

“I think we send it back to the planning committee and suggest that only stand-alone video lottery machines located in places that only allow people over the age of 21 to be allowed in the historic district,” he said. added. “I’m not a huge video lottery fan, but I’m a small business man and I had a small business. If people don’t want it that is fine, but I think it is consistent with the overall plan and with what we said our goals were going to be.

Council member Jeff Hynes, who brought forward the motion to accept the planning commission’s recommendation to keep the ordinance as it is, disagreed with Kratovil while stressing that he believed that allowing video lottery machines in downtown establishments was in fact not in line with the overall plan.

“It’s just not in line with our goal,” Hynes said. “There is no groundswell of the public to do this. Our staff don’t think it’s consistent. At the last meeting, we heard that this created difficulties for businesses, and I do not agree with that. Being in downtown Charles Town is an advantage – there is an advantage in being downtown. You have more opportunities to grow your business if you are downtown.

“I don’t accept that an upscale restaurant wants to come in and run a video lottery,” he continued. “I don’t think it will be an attraction. I think we have a vision of what our downtown will be. … Consider our investment in these downtown businesses before approving things. If we do this, we will see a downtown that thrives much more than if we change the vision we have.

Before council members spoke, City Manager Daryl Hennessy laid out some predictions on how council might proceed if it decided to return the ordinance to the planning commission. One was to make the authorization of video lottery terminals a special-purpose exception, to ensure that the process would be systematically monitored.

Another suggestion from Hennessy was to reserve the machines for a back room that would occupy no more than 10% of the commercial space. The reasoning behind this, he explained, was to ensure that machines could never be the predominant use of the building in question. Even so, as he retired, he agreed with Hynes that he did not believe that the modification of the ordinance would be compatible with the overall plan of the city.

Also on Monday, the council voted to hold a town hall at 10 a.m. on Saturday January 22, 2022 in the council chamber in order to both educate the public and hear from the public on what the city should with his American rescue plan. Act on funds. The event will also be webcast on the city’s website, so those who cannot attend in person will have the opportunity to listen and speak virtually, if they wish.

The next regular meeting of the municipal council is set for Monday, December 6 at 7 p.m.


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Eagle City Council awards $ 10 million investment in municipal broadband https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/eagle-city-council-awards-10-million-investment-in-municipal-broadband/ https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/eagle-city-council-awards-10-million-investment-in-municipal-broadband/#respond Fri, 12 Nov 2021 00:52:00 +0000 https://garysinghforcitycouncil.com/eagle-city-council-awards-10-million-investment-in-municipal-broadband/ Members of Eagle City Council are leading a discussion on a resolution to invest $ 10 million in a municipal broadband project, a resolution that was unsuccessful on Tuesday.Screenshot of the live broadcast of the meeting Eagle City Council voted to curb a $ 10 million investment in municipal broadband and asked staff to consider […]]]>

Members of Eagle City Council are leading a discussion on a resolution to invest $ 10 million in a municipal broadband project, a resolution that was unsuccessful on Tuesday.
Screenshot of the live broadcast of the meeting

Eagle City Council voted to curb a $ 10 million investment in municipal broadband and asked staff to consider a more phased approach to improving Internet service without going into so much debt.

After postponing a previously scheduled vote on what Mayor Scott Turnipseed called “the biggest decision we’ve ever made,” city council members rejected a resolution to contract a $ 10 million bond to build a fiber optic network and offer city-owned broadband service to residents.

“No one disputes that everyone would like a cheap and fast Internet,” Turnipseed said after a lengthy public hearing on Tuesday. “It’s just a matter of how we do it.”



A financing plan for the project was presented to the municipal council at its meeting on October 26. Members voted to table the question in order to get more information from staff on whether the project is worth taking on so much debt given that Comcast has focused on providing services to more. Eagle areas.

Research by city staff over the past two weeks has shown that a municipal broadband network would provide better and more affordable service to Eagle residents and business owners, according to reports included in the agenda for Tuesday’s meeting.



A 2019 survey cited in the reports showed strong buy-in from residents and business owners, 77% of whom said they wanted to switch to a city-run internet service rather than the options offered by service providers. private.

City staff presented two main options as to how city council could move forward.

Option 1 was to “go ahead with the financing terms and work with Alpine Bank and the bond board to finalize the financing so that staff can start construction with the company that was approved this year”, according to the report. The “company” is Uptown Services, a telecommunications consulting company hired by the city to help secure funding to build a larger fiber-optic broadband network.

In short, a large and aggressive investment in infrastructure to deliver state-run internet service.

Option 2 is to not go ahead with the financing plan and stick to the city’s current fiber optic connections through a partnership with THOR, a “middle” broadband project coordinated by the Northwest Colorado Council of Governments.

This option would provide mid-mile THOR access to ISPs currently operating in the city. The city could also invest in using THOR for its own needs and smaller projects, such as providing public Wi-Fi in the city center and in public parks, or in “city” initiatives. intelligent ”such as parking law enforcement or traffic control via the Internet.

In short, the option makes the most of the infrastructure the city already has.

Turnipseed opposed the bifurcation on Tuesday, saying the city should not be closed to other options regarding the potential expansion of the city’s fiber optic network.

Janet Bartnik, a member of the city council, also expressed the wish to find an intermediate option to complement the offers of the private sector without going into so much debt.

Council member David Gaboury echoed the sentiment, suggesting they take a little more time to examine areas of the city where internet service is poorest and tackle those first. this. He and Pro Mayor Tem Mikel “Pappy” Kerst said they were not in favor of a $ 10 million investment.

The transfer of the $ 10 million investment at this point does not prevent the city from expanding municipal broadband in the future, Turnipseed said. The city has 60 days to respond to Alpine Bank to see if it wants to use the financing plan that Uptown Services has negotiated with the local bank.

City council member Geoff Grimmer spoke again in favor of a city-run broadband service. He stressed that the city’s commitments to “economic vitality”, “economic resilience” and “support for quality of life” weighed in favor of continued investment.

“If we’re confident that our staff can take this thing and get it out of the park, then we’re going,” Grimmer said. “… I just think it’s a win across the board.”

Grimmer put forward a motion to approve the city’s staff’s first option to go all-out with the $ 10 million investment, but, without a second, the motion died.

Andy Davis, Comcast’s director of regulatory and government affairs, refuted many of the claims made in the city staff report about the advantages of city-operated Internet services over Comcast’s offerings.

First, the claim by city staff that Comcast does not support “net neutrality” – the idea that service providers should treat (and charge for) all Internet communications equally despite factors such as user, content, platform, location, or method of communication – is incorrect, Davis said. .

Davis also refuted the price comparison points provided by staff, saying that Comcast’s prices are in fact a little lower than pictured even after its 12-month promotional offers expire.

City staff analysis valued municipal broadband at $ 70 per month for unlimited data, compared to $ 100 per month for Comcast with a data cap and $ 130 per month for unlimited data, according to the report. Even with Davis’ numbers, the city’s monthly broadband rate would still be significantly cheaper.

Comcast’s expansion into Eagle is expected to be completed next year, by which time the company will be able to service most of the city, with the exception of the Highlands at Eagle Ranch and a few other low density areas, a Davis said at the October 26 meeting. Board meeting.

“One of the challenges for all of you is taking a huge debt to do a project when you had us build for free,” Davis said. “… We have, I would say, a larger and more robust set of capabilities. “

While the 2019 survey results showed support for municipal broadband, public comments submitted since the October 26 discussion were quite mixed.

Schools in Eagle County submitted a letter discussing the growing importance of a strong internet connection in the new era of learning brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The pandemic has accelerated reliance on the Internet service for the delivery of content and instructions,” Superintendent Philip Qualman said in the emailed letter. “A full fiber optic network throughout the town of Eagle would provide exceptional service at a reasonable rate. (Eagle County Schools) supports this proposal and would be interested in connecting schools to the network.

Local business owners, including Kat Conner, of Katch Studio, and Marci Leith, of Yeti’s Grind, have also expressed support for investing in broadband, saying the city’s poor internet service has had an impact. on their ability to effectively manage their businesses.

Conner said the internet service in his studio was “worse than dial-up”. Leith called the cafe’s internet service “barely workable … which has caused us delays, lost tickets and slow transmission for our customers.”

Others said the costs and risks associated with $ 10 million in debt outweighed the benefits of city-funded broadband.

Kenneth Sexton, Geographic Information Systems Assessment Specialist with the Eagle County Government, said the investment was not worth it, “especially since it is tied to our fund. company for wastewater “.

“We have options available to us with CenturyLink, Comcast and Starlink,” Sexton said in an emailed comment.

“Internet technology is changing rapidly and many private companies have years of experience in this area,” another resident wrote in an emailed statement. “Putting up the city for debt spending when private companies already do it doesn’t seem like a prudent thing to do with taxpayer dollars. “

Ultimately, city council asked staff to consider a more phased approach to maximize use of the city’s current fiber optic connections and potentially expand into areas with particularly poor internet service. A working session is scheduled for December 7 to discuss ways forward.


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